History of Steeton 1886


History of Steeton 1886

BY
John Clough, Jr.

KEIGHLEY
PRINTED BY S. BILLOWS, HIGH STREET.
1886.

History of Steeton

HoS-flowersHoS-The village of Steeton is very ancient. This is proved from various old records, though we do not find that the Romans ever had a settlement in this immediate neighbourhood. Their stations at Colonia (Colne) on the one hand, Olicana (Ilkley) on the other, and Cambodumum (Slack in the parish of Halifax) were at no great distance; and it is most probable that a Roman road passed through the township. The Roman road is supposed to have crossed the river at the Streams, a little above the present bridge; it went straight up the hill, in the direction of the Old Bank. Nearly at the top of Old Bank there is a straight piece of road nearly paved; this is supposed to be part of the old Roman road. Traces of it were met with in the beginning of the present century, when the commons were enclosed; its direction evidently pointed at the Roman station of Slack. We have no Druidical remains to shew that the Ancient Britons were settled in the locality, though no doubt they would frequently pass through these parts on their hunting excursions. It is not till the Saxon period that we have anything reliable.

The early name of Steeton, Dr. Whitaker conjectures, is derived from its first Saxon possessor being called Stephen, and hence Stiveton or the Town of Stephen. At what period it was first inhabited, it would at this distance of time be impossible to come to a reliable conclusion. One thing is almost certain, that it must have been inhabited several generations before the conquest; perhaps not later than the reign of King Alfred. What adds strength to this conjecture is, that at the taking of the Domesday Survey, A.D. 1080-86, Steeton and Eastburn are said to contain 550 acres in cultivation. This is rather a large amount, considering that the area of the township of Steeton-with-Eastburn is 2065 acres. This proves that the township had been long inhabited previous to that period.

We are now arrived at the Norman conquest. At that time Steeton was held by a great Saxon Thane, named Gamelbar, who held eight other manors in the neighbourhood besides. He was displaced to make room for Gilbertus or Gilbert Tyson who came into England with William the conqueror, and was standard-bearer at the Battle of Hastings. This distinguished person sprung from the powerful house of Tesson, who ruled in Normandy a tract of country in the department of Calvados known as Le Cinglais, of which Thurry Harcourt was the capital. For his services at the Battle of Hastings he had twenty-nine manors granted to him by the Conqueror. He having in the reign of William Rufus joined with Robert Mowbray, Earl of Northumberland, in a rebellion, his lands, along with the lands of several other Norman Lords, were forfeited to the Crown. However, in the reign of Henry I he regained favour, and had part of his estates restored to him. He had a son Adam, who was living 31st Henry I (A.D. 1131).

The next Lords were the Percys, who had already become possessed of some of the forfeited lands, but by what means we have no account. As early as A.D. 1168, a return of the Knights enfeoffed in their honour was made, and the estates of the Tysons form part. The Percy estates in Craven continued in the hands of that family for nearly four centuries after this period; it was not till the reign of Henry VII that the Percy-fee was obtained by the Cliffords through a marriage between the two families. During these four eventful centuries, could the forays, the battles, and other warlike achievements be enumerated, volumes would be filled. It certainly would be interesting to know how oft the inhabitants of Steeton were participators in these encounters; perhaps some of them were present at the Battle of Otterburne, which is so celebrated and almost immortalised in the ancient Ballad of Chevy-Chase; it is probable that some of them were engaged at the Battle of Shrewsbury. It was at the Battle of Shrewsbury, in 1403, that young Hotspur, son of the Earl of Northumberland, had joined Owen Glendower, a Welsh Chieftain, in his rebellion against Henry IV, and in which battle young Hotspur was slain. In one old document it is mentioned that the manors of Steeton and Glusburn were in 1403 in the king’s hands; this was in consequence of the Earl of Northumberland taking part in rebellion. A few years after this, son of this Hotspur had the family estates restored to him, and he became the second Earl of Northumberland.

And now we come to the Stivetons, who lived at Steeton, and were mesne lords under the Percys. A mesne lord owed suit and service to his superior, had to attend him in any of his wars, and had to pay him a small sum resembling a quit-rent yearly; but in other respects the mesne lord may be considered as full proprietor of the soil. He parcelled out the land to his under-tenants, received the rents and profits; and these under-tenants held under him similarly to the tenure he held under his chief lord, and had to go to battle with him when he attended his superior. In other respects the rents of the inferior tenants were not high, – it might almost be said they were little more than nominal; and further, they appear to have been stationary, for the rent-roll of the Plumptons of both Steeton and Eastburn, in 1418, was £29 17s. 6d., and the same rent-roll to Sir Ingram Clifford about a century later was £30 18s. 10d. The difference, £1 1s. 4d. is little, and may be accounted for by encroachments on the common, which are frequently mentioned in the court-rolls. The perquisites of courts were included in the above sums, and they form more than one-third of the whole amount. It seems strange that the tenants were charged considerably more per acre for land taken from the common than they were paying for their old enclosed land. This is evidence that their farms were held at a low rent.

The first of these mesne lords under the Percys were the Stivetons; one of them Raino de Stiveton, was witness to a grant of land by the family of Allerton to Kirkstall Abbey; this deed is without date, but it is supposed by Dr. Whitaker to be about the year A.D. 1190. We have no particulars about his next successors Elias and William, but of the next, another Elias, which it is supposed was the son of William, we have some record; he had a charter from Thomas Prior of Bolton, to celebrate divine service in his chapel at Steeton, he (Elias) granting to the said prior a certain garth called Chapel-yard. Dr Whitaker conjectures that, though the chapel seems to have been detached from the house, it was merely a domestic oratory, and it is only remembered by these transactions. Robert de Stiveton, successor and probably son of the aforesaid Elias, deserves special notice – it is his recumbent statue which is to be seen in Kildwick Church at the present time. From the appearance of the statue he was a Knight-Templar, and it is probable that he would accompany Edward I to the Holy Land in 1271. King Edward made frequent excursions to Scotland, which partly accounts for the many knights he created in the northern counties. Sir Robert de Stiveton was one of these knights; he died in 1307, in the same year as his sovereign, and was buried in Kildwick Church. His funeral was a magnificent one judging from its cost; according to an article in the compotus of Bolton Abbey, there was upwards of £2 paid for fish, etc.; since more than two centuries after this time a dairy-cow could be bought for eight or nine shillings, £2 was a great sum. It was a custom in those days at a funeral of any person of note, to apply to a neighbouring monastery for extra things.

The successor of Sir Robert was John1, the last of the Stivetons. Nothing remarkable is related of him, but he must have lived in some splendour, as it is related in the compotus of Bolton that £3 11s. 4d. was paid for half a piece of cloth and fur for his lady – £3 11s. 4d. being a much greater sum in those days than now.

The next mesne lords of Steeton were the Plumptons; Sir William Plumpton married Alice, daughter of Sir Henry Byaufiz, in 1322, and succeeded his father, Sir Robert, in 1324. This Sir William Plumpton bore for arms2 ar. Five fusils in fesse, with an escallop on each fusil for difference, sa. Sir William’s grandfather had adopted the arms from their connection with the Percys, the Percys’ arms being az. Five fusils conjoined in fesse, or. Sir Robert de Stiveton bore the same arms, except the fusils were charged with vair for difference; both the Stivetons and the Plumptons owned the Percys as their superior lords. The Hebdens, of Hebden-in-Craven, whose superior lords were the Percys, also had for their arms erm, five fusils in fesse gu.

Sir William Plumpton died in 1362. His son, Sir Robert, married Isabella, daughter of the first Lord Scrope of Masham. He had a son, Sir William, who suffered death on the scaffold for the part he took in the insurrection in 1405, which was instigated by his uncle, Richard Scrope, Archbishop of York. Sir Robert died in 1407, and was succeeded by his grandson, Sir Robert Plumpton, who was then 24 years of age; his mother was Alice, daughter of John Gisburn, Merchant of York, who was Mayor of that city in 1371, 1372 and 1380. Sir Robert3 married Alice, daughter and heiress of Sir Godfrey Foljambe, Kt., by which marriage he obtained estates in the counties of Nottingham and Derby; he died in 1421, leaving a son William, then in his eighteenth year, and who was during his minority a ward to the Earl of Northumberland. William4 married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Brian Stapilton, and had two sons, Robert and William, by this marriage. Robert5 when young was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas, Lord Clifford. Robert died when he had been married three years, and then his wife was re-married to his brother William. The issue of the second marriage was two daughters6, Margaret and Elizabeth; Margaret was afterwards married to John, son of Brian Rocliffe of Colthorpe, com. Ebor, third Baron of the King’s Exchequer; Elizabeth married John, eldest son of Henry Sotehill, Esq.

The following account is extracted from papers formerly kept at Skipton Castle – papers containing the depositions of witnesses in the great law-suit which took place after the death of Sir William Plumpton between William Plumpton and Elizabeth Clifford, and Sir Robert, son of Sir William Plumpton:-

“Be it knowne to all men, that forasmuch as it is nedeful for every true Chrysten man to testify and

“bere true wytnes in every true matter or cause, therefore we, William Ratcliffe, being the age of

“VXX yeres, Nicholas iiiiXVIII yeres, and John Thorn of iiiiXX yeres, record and testify for verrey

“trawthe that the Lord Sir Thomas Clifford marryed his daughter Elizabeth unto Robert Plumpton,

“the eldest son and heyre of Sir William Plumpton when she was but six yeres of age and they were

“wedded at the chappel within the castel of Skypton and on the same day one, John Garth, bare her

“in his arms to the said chappel, and also it was agreed at the same time that if the aforesaid Robert

“dyed within age that then the said Lord Clifford should have the second son of the said Sir William

“Plumpton unto his said daughter. And they were but three yeres marryed when the said Robert

“died, and when she came to the age of twelve yeres she was marryed to William Plumpton, second

“son of Sir William Plumpton.”

 

No particulars of these marriages are to be got from the Plumpton records; all evidence relating to them was suppressed, the reason being that Sir William Plumpton himself was clandestinely married7 to Joan Wintringham about the same time, and he was now seeking to effect a settlement of his lands on his heirs-male by his second marriage in preference to any female issue of his eldest son. Sir William had a son Robert by his second marriage; the cause of the lawsuit that followed Sir William’s death was that Robert was not considered a legitimate son, and the decision was in accordance with that opinion. In 1453, Sir William Plumpton, by two enfeoffments8, entailed all his estates in the counties of York, Derby, Nottingham, and Stafford upon Sir William Plumpton and his heirs-male, with remainder to Robert Plumpton, his brother, and his heirs-male. These transactions are the origin of the lawsuit which sometimes seemed to slumber but never slept for upwards of thirty years, and ended in upsetting all the deep-laid plans of Sir William Plumpton to hand down his name to posterity.

As Sir William Plumpton was connected with the Cliffords and Percys, both of whom were zealous Lancastrians, it is easy to conclude why he was on the side of the Lancastrians in the War of the Roses. Two mandates were issued in rapid succession on the 12th and 13th March, 1461, by Henry VI to Sir William Plumpton, summoning all liege men of the Forest of Knaresborough (Sir William was Master Forester of Knaresborough) to meet the enemy and to repair to the royal presence with his array with all haste possible. On the 29th of the same month, being Palm Sunday, he was present at the decisive Battle of Towton; his son and heir-apparent, William, was slain, and he himself was made prisoner by Edward. He suffered imprisonment for a short time, but was released by paying a fine of £2000, which he gave bond to pay before the Feast of Pentecost following.

At the Battle of Towton, 37,000 men lost their lives, amongst whom were the Earl of Northumberland, Lord Clifford, and the flower of Craven; and it is but reasonable to suppose that Steeton had its full share among the victims of this sanguinary battle, and that the blood of many of her brave sons helped to crimson the flood of the Wharfe, which, tradition says, ran blood for three days after the battle.

Sir William Plumpton was afterwards restored to his office of Constable of Knaresborough Castle and Master-Forester of the Forest of Knaresborough; and the infant daughters of his son William, who was killed at Towton, were disposed of in marriage by him. By an indenture, dated November 26th, 1463, covenants that the governance and marriage of Margaret, being then about four years old, the eldest daughter of William Plumpton deceased, were granted to Brian Rocliffe, of Colthorpe, com. Ebor, third Baron of the King’s Exchequer, to the intent that John, son and heir of the said Brian, shall take to wife the said Margaret at convenient and most speedy time, at the cost of the said Brian, and who has also to pay four hundred marks; Sir William agreeing to settle the manor of Nesfield upon them, but retaining part of the rents for first ten years. In like manner, Elizabeth, the younger co-heiress, was contracted to John, eldest son of Henry Sotehill, Esq., which Henry agrees to pay to Sir William Plumpton £333 0s. 0d., Sir William making over to them an estate of forty marks per annum.

The private life of Sir William Plumpton, after his wife’s death, caused scandal in the neighbourhood; and when he received money for the marriage of his grand-daughters it must have been his fixed resolve to deprive them of their inheritance. He died in 1480, aged 76. Sometime before his death, May 1st, 1478, he made an absolute deposition of all his property, all his personal effects both movable and immovable, in favour of his son, Sir Robert Plumpton.

Sir Robert married firstly in January, 1478 (marriage covenant 13th July, 17 Edward IV. 1477) Agnes, daughter of Sir William Gascoigne, Kt., of Gawthorpe, near Harewood. She had issue William, besides other children, and died in 1504. Sir Robert married secondly before 18th September, 21st Henry VII. 1505, Isabel or Eliza, daughter of Ralph, Lord Nevill, son and heir-apparent of Ralph, Earl of Westmoreland, but they had no issue. She married secondly on March 20th, 1528-9, Lawrence Kighley, Esq., of Newhall, near Otley. Sir Robert’s will is dated 10th April, 14 Henry VII. 1523, and he died the same year, aged 70.

The heirs-general and their guardians, seeing the steps that Sir William Plumpton had taken to alienate the property which they considered belonged to themselves, even as far back as the year 1453 they had to interfere in his daughter’s behalf, Sir William being then attempting to make away with some property which he had previously settled in a marriage settlement; and finding that he had made such a deposition of his property as nearly if not entirely to disinherit them, saw no other means of redress than going to a court of law.

In 1482, John Roucliffe and Margaret his wife, grand-daughter of the late Sir William Plumpton, and John Sotehill and Elizabeth his wife, the other grand-daughter, entered into a bond of £2000 that Joan Plumpton and Robert Plumpton junr., that they and all others having right or title through the said Margaret and Elizabeth their wives, should abide by the decision; it was also inserted in the same bond that the Prince Richard Duke of Gloucester, the Earl of Northumberland, and others, were the arbitrators chosen by both parties. Subsequently, February 14th, 1482-3, the conditions of the bond were altered, and the agreement was to abide by the award of the king, to be given in writing before the 7th of July ensuing. However, Edward IV died April 9th, 1483, consequently the bond was renewed on September 12th, and judgement9 was given on the 16th of that month by the king, Richard III. The result was that sixteen manors, producing a nett rent of £149 6s. 8d., were awarded to the heirs-general. This was considered an equitable decision; the litigants lived in harmony for a time, until another lawsuit was begun. Henry, son of John Sotehill, married a daughter of Sir Richard Empson; Empson, along with Dudley, were tyrannical and unscrupulous ministers of Henry VII. Of these it is written in the History of England by Hume and Smollett:-

“The king had found two ministers, Empson and Dudley, perfectly qualified to second his rapacious and tyrannical inclinations, and to prey on the defenceless people – these instruments of oppression were both lawyers; the first of mean birth, of brutal manners, of an unrelenting temper; the second better born, better educated, and better bred, but equally unjust, severe, and inflexible. By their knowledge in law, these men were qualified to pervert the forms of justice to the oppression of the innocent; and the formidable authority of the king supported them in all their iniquities. It was their usual practice at first to observe so far the appearance of law as to give indictments to those whom they intended to oppress: on which the persons were committed to prison, but never brought to trial; and were at length obliged, in order to recover their liberty, to pay heavy fines and ransoms, which were called mitigations and compositions. By degrees the very appearance of law was neglected, etc.”

Through the instrumentality of Sir Richard Empson, another lawsuit was commenced against Sir Robert Plumpton, it was tried at York Assizes, and the verdict was against Sir Robert. He refused to abide by the verdict; he forcibly kept possession of the property; he wrote a petition to the king, who made him a Knight to protect him from arrest10; but the inexorable Empson still persevered, and it was put into the hands of Richard Fox, Bishop of Winchester and Lord Privy Seal. His award was that Steeton with seventeen other manors should go to the heirs-general, and only the manor of Plumpton, near Knaresborough, be assigned to Sir Robert.

Sir Robert Plumpton11 was the last of the Plumptons who owned Steeton; he died A.D. 1523, aged 70. Sympathy cannot but be felt for him – he was a different man to his father – more upright in his dealings. When the first award was made assigning nearly one-half of his property to his nieces, the heirs-general, he quietly submitted to the mandate; it was when the second verdict came which awarded nearly all his remaining property to the same persons, that he made resistance to such an unjust decree.

Steeton now, the beginning of the sixteenth century, became the property of the heirs-general of the Plumptons, and it is necessary to go into the following particulars to shew how the manor first became divided into two halves and afterwards into one half and two quarters. Though the manor was apparently divided it was not really so, one farmer lived under three landlords each receiving their portion of the rent; Anthony Garforth, who was the principal tenant12 at Steeton, had a lease granted him for eighty years dated November 21st, 1562, by Ingram Clifford for one moiety of lands there specified, and by Anthony Thorold and William Bevercoates for the other two quarters, half the rent is covenanted to be paid to Sir Ingram Clifford, and the other half to Thorold and Bevercoates in equal proportions.

It has been before stated that William, son and heir of Sir William Plumpton, Kt., was killed at the Battle of Towton, 1461, leaving two infant daughters his heirs; the eldest, Margaret, was married to John, son of Brian Roucliffe of Colthorp in Yorkshire, and one of the Barons of the Exchequer. They had a son, Brian, who married Margaret daughter of Sir Thomas Metham; they had a son John Roucliffe, who had an only daughter and heir, Ann13 who is supposed to have married Sir Ingram Clifford, second son of Henry the first earl of Cumberland. Sir Ingram Clifford, who had an only daughter who died young, left the half of the manor of Steeton which he owned to his nephew, George the third earl of Cumberland. This nobleman sold half14 of the manor of Steeton in 1604-5 to two land speculators of the names of Slater and Midgeley, who in 1607 sold this half to William Garforth.

Whitaker, in his history of Craven, says:- “George, Earl of Cumberland was a great but amiable man. His story admirably illustrates the difference between greatness and contentment, between fame and virtue. If we trace him in the public history of the times we see nothing but the accomplished courtier, the skilful navigator, the intrepid commander, the disinterested patriot. If we follow him into his family we are instantly struck with the indifferent and unfaithful husband, the negligent and thoughtless parent. If we enter his muniment room we are surrounded by memorials of his prodigality, mortgages and sales, inquietude and approaching want. He set out with a larger estate than any of his ancestors, and in a little more than twenty years he made it one of the least. Fortunately for his family, a constitution originally vigorous, gave way at forty-seven to hardship, anxiety and wounds.”

William Slater lived in the parish of Bradford and William Midgeley in the neighbourhood of Halifax; they held lands in Steeton for about three years during which period it is thought they sold several small quantities of land. This was the origin of freeholders in Steeton for it is expressly stated in 1583 that there were no freeholders. At this time 1604-7 the property afterwards belonging to the Currers, Davys, Hustlers etc., would in all probability be purchased.

The second daughter of the aforesaid William Plumpton killed at Towton, Elizabeth, married John, son of Henry Sotehill, Esq., of Stockfaston, Herts; they had a son Henry, who when very young married the daughter of Sir Richard Empson, Kt., which has been alluded to. Two daughters were the issue of this marriage, Jane and Elizabeth. Jane, who married John, son of Sir John Constable, Kt., of Flamborough, had issue Ann and Cecilia; Ann married Sir Anthony Thorold, of Marston, Lincolnshire, whose only daughter Winfred married George, son of Sir Gervase Clifton, Kt., of Clifton, Nottingham; Sir Gervase Clifton, Bart, their son, sold one quarter14 of the manor of Steeton to William Garforth in 1613. Cecilia married firstly William Bevercoates, Esq., and secondly Clement Oglethorp, Esq., of Roundhay, near Leeds; William Oglethorp, of Roundhay, sold in the year 1600 one quarter14 of the manor of Steeton and Glusburn to William Garforth for £460, which was the first purchase made by the Garforths. Elizabeth, second daughter of Henry Sotehill, married Sir William Drury.

A survey of the manor of Steeton was taken in 1583, a few years previous to the Garforths purchasing it; it is interesting to read an account about Steeton as it was three hundred years ago. After tracing the boundaries of the township, which appear to be nearly the same as they are at present, it thus proceeds:-

The Lordship or Manor of Steeton was sometime the lands of Sir — Plumpton, and before that (as is said) it was the inheritance of Sir Robert de Stiveton, Kt., who died in 1307, and whose monument or gravestone is still to be seen in Kildwick Church, the parish church of the said Lordship. The half of the said Lordship is now lawfully descended and conveyed unto George, Earl of Cumberland, and the remainder to Anthony Thorold, Esq., and dame Ann his wife, and William Bevercoates, gentleman, and Cecilia his wife, in equal proportions. The said Manor is situated in the Wapentake of Staincliffe in Craven, and thereupon is called Steeton-in-Craven, and is distant from the market-town of Skipton four miles upon the river of Aire. A great part of the lands of the said Lordship lye upon the banks of the river Aire, and are of very fertile and fruitful soil, and would yield the occupier great plenty of corn and grass, save that the river will, sometimes in summer, but very oft in winter, overflow the most part of the ground, to the great damage and loss of the inhabitants.
The Manor-house called Steeton Hall, standeth at the north end of the said town upon the banks of a brook called Steeton Beck; the same is now in convenient repair for the use of the farmer that holdeth the same. The demyne lands that belong to the said Manor are indifferently large and great, and the soil for the most part is very fertile and good, except when the river Aire overflows its banks, at which times the ground will be so degged with mud that the cattle will not feed thereupon, nor will hunger force them.

PRIVILEGES

The lords of the said Manor have had, and used to keep within the same, a Court Baron once a year, and also have had, and now hath, Waives and Estrays, with such like privileges incident, and of right or custom, belonging to the said Manor. They have also the free liberty of fishing and fowling, hunting and hawking within the limits aforesaid, and at the death of each tenant, or the most of them, their best goods for a Heriot (that is, the best horse, cow, plate, or other valuables).

COURTS

There is a Court held in Craven called the Wapentake Court, or commonly the Running Court, because it is held here and there at the discretion of the officers. The same is sometimes appointed to be holden at Steeton, where the ferme of the demayne (chief tenant) yields to the officers their demands or six and eightpence in money. There is also paid out of the said Lordship thirteen and fourpence for wapentake fines; there is also another custom due to the bailiff of the Percy-fee in Craven, namely, that every husbandman shall yield him yearly a bushel of oats in respect of their services at the Gisburn Court.

REMARKS

The aforesaid things should be further looked into; formerly the inhabitants owed their services to the Manor of Gisburn, then they need not suit the Wapentake Court; or otherwise if they must of necessity appear at the Wapentake Court, then they need not pay any duty to the Percy Bailiff in consideration of their appearance at Gisburn. The most likely way is that they hold of Gisburn, and that in respect of the wapentake fine they are not only to be discharged from their appearance at the Wapentake Court, but also to have in respect thereof all things incident unto the Leet of the Wapentake within the limits and bounds of the said Lordship.

WOODS

There are no woods within the Lordship to make any great account of; the same is not sufficient for the maintenance of the tenant’ houses, if they were kept only for that purpose. Neither is there any underwood of value, save in one parcel of the demayne there are some ellers.

There is also on the banks of the south side of the town certain Schroggs which, the inhabitants do affirm, was new copied; neither could the tenants well spare the herbage of these grounds and if they could, it is to be doubted if there would be any wood of value, as the place lieth so cold.

COMMONS

There is within the said Lordship one great Common called Steeton Moor, containing by estimation 300 acres, wherein the tenants of Steeton and Eastburn have common of pasture for their cattle without stint. The said common is very wild, lingy, and heathy ground, and lieth on the south side of the said towns of Steeton and Eastburn, and the tenants of the said towns do pay yearly for moor-rent twenty shillings; in consideration thereof the tenants allege that the lords of the said Manor have promised in times past to make no improvement there.

BOONS

There is an ancient custom that every husbandman within the said Lordship shall yield unto the lord of the Manor of Steeton or to his Ferme for the time being, one day’s ploughing, two sickle boons, one scythe boon, and one hedge boon, in which respect the lord or his said Ferme did yield to them a Dymd at Christmas, which said custom continues unto this day and is of the value of 104 shillings annually.

N.B.— The Ferme means the principal tenant who always resided at the hall, and was the representative of the lord of the Manor, and appears to have received all his homages and services.

AN OUT RENT, ETC.

There is yearly paid out of the Lordship of Steeton to the bailiff of the lands, late St. John of Jerusalem, 12d. by three of the lord’s tenants, Robert Hall, John Hall and Anthony Fox, 4d. each out of their tenements in Steeton, in consideration of which the said tenants shall have their last will proved by the officer of the said lands at the Redj Hall in the parish of Glusburn (perhaps Royd15 House in the township of Glusburn) at a certain reasonable rate, and that they should also be free in certain fairs. They also appear at the court holden at the said Redj Hall, and pay their money to the owner of the said house. John Eastburn, the lord’s tenant in Eastburn, doth likewise pay to the bailiff of the lands aforesaid, 14d. per annum, and by the like cause and consideration aforesaid.

N.B.— The aforesaid money is paid by the tenants besides their accustomed rents.

TOWN TERME AND HERIOTS

The lord’s tenants within the said Manor of Steeton are, and have been accustomed time out of memory of man, to pay unto the Lord at every ten years’ end, one whole year’s rent besides their accustomed rent. This is commonly called Town Terme, the which, together with other Heriots hereafter mentioned, is paid in consideration of the fines on the Grassemes of their tenements.

The same tenants, or the most part of them, do also pay unto the lord Heriots, viz., at the death of him or her, that is the lord’s tenant, and the principal of every household, the best goods they have at the said house for a Heriot, and some 6d, as they have been accustomed; and in order that it may appear the clearer from what tenements the same is now paid, the names, rents, and Heriots will be found in the following account, being the rents paid by the tenants of Steeton and Eastburn, A.D. 1583.

DEMAYNES

 

  

Rents

 

Heriots

£

s.

d.

Anthony Garforth,
Manor House &c

1

12

0

0



Corn Mill 24s., Cottage and
)


Improvement 2s. 4d.
)

1

1

6

4

Tenants in Steeton

  

 

John Garforth,
Lands and Tenements

3

2

12

4

Thomas Smith

1

0

4

6

Dennis Cockshott

1

0

8

4

Richard Harper

1

0

5

4

John Barrett

1

0

7

8



for one close called Atpool

1

0

1

8

Richard Hustler,
Lands and Tenements

1

0

9

9

Elizabeth Mitchell

1

0

9

9

Elizabeth Lund

1

0

9

9

Thomas Coate

1

0

8

4

William Davy

1

0

8

4

William Garforth

1

0

9

4

William Smith

1

0

18

11

Anthony Smith

1

1

0

0

Robert Hall

1

0

5

0

John Hall

1

0

5

0

Anthony Fox

1

0

5

0

William Whitaker

1

0

17

9

Robert Denton

1

0

0

6

John Theaker

1

0

1

0

Thomas Parkinson

1

0

1

0

Richard Ambler

1

0

3

4

Robert Eastburn

1

0

0

4

Jane Barrett

1

0

0

4

Anthony Wilson

1

0

0

4

William Smith

1

0

5

8

Tenants of Eastburn

John Eastburn,
Lands and Tenements

1

0

17

0

Henry Ripley

1

0

13

8

Alice Parkinson

)

John Parkinson

)

1

0

13

8

William Parkinson

1

0

11

3

Christopher Eastburn

1

0

11

3

Thomas Mason

1

0

1

8

Anthony Eastburn

1

0

1

0

Mrs Moorhouse
pays a Mallard or Drake for a Heriot

0

0

0

£27

13

1

Formerly, in the sixteenth century, Steeton would be the second township in point of size in Kildwick parish, for we read that in 1513, the number of men that were summoned by Lord Clifford from the parish of Kildwick to attend him to the wars which culminated in the battle of Flodden Field were as follows:

Steeton, 8 men

Kildwick, 3 men

Cowling, 4 men

Sutton, 2 men

Cononley and Farnhill,
4 men

Glusburn, 2 men

Bradley, 4 men

Silsden, no return

Besides, it is found in the Court Baron Rolls for the year 1545 that 40 persons paid suit and service, and in 1591 there are 45 persons performing the same offices. But after the Garforths got possession of Steeton there appears to have been a considerable decrease, unless the other towns in the parish had been rapidly progressing in the interval which is improbable. This will be more apparent from a document which was in the possession of Miss Currer of Eshton Hall. This document mentions that in the year 1658, a general meeting was called at Kildwick to make an assessment for the relief of the poor of the parish, and in which all the rate-payers of each township are separately mentioned, and the money each has to pay. The following extract shows that Steeton at this time, instead of being second on the list is now placed in the back position of one-sixth.

£

s.

d.

Silsden

has 130 persons paying cess amounting to

4

6

8

Cowling

has 97 persons paying cess amounting to

1

14

2

Cononley
and Farnhill
has 45 persons paying cess amounting to

1

11

6

Bradley

has 34 persons paying cess amounting to

1

6

10

Steeton

has 31 persons paying cess amounting to

1

4

6

Sutton

has 49 persons paying cess amounting to

1

24

4

Kildwick

has 16 persons paying cess amounting to

1

0

Glusburn

has 29 persons paying cess amounting to

0

19

6

Total

£13

5

Steeton receding from its position of second to the sixth place in the parish appears strange, as there does not appear to have been any particular mortality here more than in any other part of the parish. On examining the Kildwick Parish Registers, it is found that the plague was prevalent in 1604, and again with greater severity in 1623-4, when 114 persons were buried in seven months, the yearly average being about sixty; but in both these cases it seems to have been spread generally about the parish, each village was more or less affected by it. The probable solution of the cause of the decrease is, that under the Cliffords in 1683, there were a great many tenants with small holdings, and that the Garforths, after they came into possession of the estate, thought it more advantageous to throw two or, perhaps three of these little farms together. The Garforths and Currers, the two largest owners of land in Steeton, kept a great proportion of their land in their own possession, which will be seen by the following:- that Mr. Garforth paid 5s. 4d., and Mr. Currer 2s. 8d., out of a total of £1 4s. 6d., nearly one-third of the whole township. The population of Steeton with Eastburn in 1881 was 1497, being now the fourth township in point of population in the parish, Silsden, Cowling, Glusburn being larger.

We have now got to the time when the Garforths have got to be proprietors of land in Steeton; as has before been stated, they purchased the manor of Steeton and Glusburn from the heirs-general of the Plumptons. The first Garforth in connection with Steeton on record is Richard Garforth, who was probably born in or about 1470. This Richard was at the Battle of Flodden Field in 1513; he went with horse and harness, which is almost a certain proof that he was a gentleman, and lived at the Manor House. There was a John Garforth, who is supposed to be his brother, and six other persons that accompanied him. Dennis Garforth, or, as he is called in the court-rolls, Dyonisius Garforth, who married a Thornhill of Burley, near Otley, and who died in 1579 aged 80, is supposed to be the son of the above Richard; he lived at Steeton Hall, and his name appears first with the title of officer prefixed on the court-rolls for more than thirty years. Anthony, his son, married Alice, the daughter of Sir Edmund Mauleverer, of Arncliffe, near Northallerton; by this marriage the pedigree of the Garforths can be traced to John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, son of Edward III, King of England. This Anthony died in 1587. The son of Anthony16, William, married Rosamund Rawson, of Shipley; he purchased the manor, which has been previously alluded to. Though the Garforths had lived at the hall a century before this, they were tenants, not the owners of the property. The first purchase made by the Garforths was in 1600, when they bought one quarter of the manor of Steeton and Glusburn for £460 10s. 0d., of William Oglethorpe, Esq., of Roundhay, near Leeds. It is not known what the Garforths gave for three quarters of the manor, but if it be reckoned at the same rate as was given for the one quarter that we do know, the total would be £1842. It is known that there was only a small quantity of land that went with the manor of Glusburn, so it is very probable that the manor and the lands belonging to it of Steeton and Eastburn at the beginning of the seventeenth century was bought for about £1700. What quantity of land went with the manor of Steeton is not known exactly, but it is very probable from what is known that it would be less than half the township. The reason why it is concluded that not one-half of the township was bought with the manor at the beginning of the seventeenth century is, that in 1787, J.B. Garforth’s share of the expense of the enclosure of common was £306 14s. 11d. out of the total of £802 15s. 6d., and that they alienated any of their property in the interval is not known17, and is improbable.

DIVISION OF STEETON COMMON BY ACT OF PARLIAMENT18 OBTAINED IN THE YEAR 1787.

–––––––––––––


s.  dec.

Allowance for Roads, Quarries, &c
60.067



Manorial Rights
352.129



Proprietors below
3873.349


4285.545

 

Names
of Proprietors

Value
of old Inclosures

Proportion
of Common

Proportion
of Tax

s.
dec.

s.
dec.

£

s.

d.

John
Baynes Garforth, Esq.

9257.764

1262.339

306

14

11

Thomas
Garforth, Esq. (A late purchase)

6893.955

982.751

186

14

5

Mr.
William Davy

2400.975

333.735

63

8

2

 
William Rishworth

2177.148

302.625

57

9

1

Rev.
William Norton

1817.181

252.590

47

19

10

Mr.
John Driver

1561.253

217.014

41

4

8

 
John Cunliffe

621.090

86.331

16

8

0

 
Robert Holmes

460.890

64.480

12

5

0

Vicar
of Featherston

402.220

55.910

10

12

5

Mr.
Samuel Smith

350.600

48.732

9

5

2

 
T. Garforth for Henry Stirk

348.220

48.402

9

3

11

 
Thomas Brigg

317.750

44.167

8

7

10

 
John Cowling

308.850

42.930

8

3

2

 
John Clapham

221.200

30.746

5

16

10

Sir
John Goodrick, Bart.

158.256

22.

4

3

7

Mr.
Robert Smith

120.

16.680

3

3

4

 
William Paget

77.060

10.711

2

0

8

Miss
Foulds

62.800

8.730

1

13

2

James
Craven

60.

8.340

1

11

7

Sir
John Goodrick, Bart., and Mr. Dixon

56.500

7.853

1

9

10

Mr.
Thomas Hodgson

45.

6.255

1

3

9

Mr.
Dixon

32.340

4.500

0

17

2

Mr.
Netherwood

29.520

4.103

0

15

7

 
Joseph Edwards

..

4.103

0

15

2

Mr.
Parker

28.400

3.950

0

15

0

 
Samuel Smith (leasehold)

25.

3.475

0

13

3

27833.972

3873.349

£802

15

6

After
William Garforth, the purchaser of the manor, came another William Garforth19
his son, who married Jenet, daughter of Thomas Emmott, of Emmott Hall; he died
1669. Then there was Anthony Garforth, who was born 1610, and died 1670, son
of the last William. William Garforth had, besides others, a son Edmund20,
who was Vicar of Kildwick and Vicar of Gargrave 1660-73. Steeton Hall was
rebuilt in 1662, and the names of the preceding are yet to be seen over the
kitchen window. Anthony Garforth married Susan, daughter of Thomas Crossley,
of Hullenedge, near Halifax.

Of this
Garforth we have recorded the following incident:- At York on January 31st,
1664-5, John Hoyle, of Keighley, saith before Sir John Armitage “that a
month or five weeks before the discovery of the late plot, he heard Mr.
Anthony Garforth, of Steeton, say, ‘I desire you to lend me £10.’ The
informant told him he had it not. Then Mr. Garforth said, ‘If he had it not
he would have it somewhere, for he would have £10 or £20 by him, for there
will be such a stir as never was yet, for the king hath declared himself to be
a Roman Catholic and hath gone to mass with the queen.’ And said he held the
declaration in his pocket. He would have declared the above to Mr. Justice
Wade, but that he was interrupted by Lieutenant-Colonel Malham.” He was
fined £20, bound in £200, and in £100 each of Edmund Garforth, of Gargrave,
Clerk (Vicar of Gargrave and his brother), and William Garforth, of Gargrave,
Gent.

There is
recorded another incident of the seventeenth century in connection with
Steeton:- Jeremiah Denby, of Steeton, was indicted at York for saying at
Kildwick, 26th July, 1684, to Richard Pollard, Clerk (Vicar of Kildwick
1678-97), “The king himself is a great favourer of Anabaptists, and those
are the best Christians that come least to church, for all I know.”

Anthony
Garforth had a son William21, who married firstly a Miss Rishworth,
of Morton, and then Mrs. Dixon, of Sutton. Edmund22, son of
the last-named William, married Elizabeth Grandorge, of Skipton (she was
buried at Kildwick 1742); he was born in 1677, and died on July 2nd, 1722,
leaving two sons23, Edward and Thomas. Thomas the younger son, died
a.d. 1743, unmarried.

The last
Edward Garforth24, who died about 1760, left the property to his
nephew John Baynes, the son of his sister Elizabeth (she was buried at
Kildwick Sept. 9th, 1740), who had married Ralph Baynes, Esq., of Mewith Head
Hall, near Bentham. The nephew, John Baynes, had to take the name of Garforth,
which he afterwards did. He was educated at Skipton Grammar School, and
articled to an attorney at Carlisle; he also became agent or steward for Sir
James Lowther, under whose patronage he became member of Parliament for
Appleby or Cockermouth.

He was
displaced to make way for the celebrated statesman, William Pitt. Sir James
Lowther, hearing that William Pitt, then a promising young man, had been
defeated in a contest for the representation of the University of Cambridge,
caused an attorney in the north, John Baynes Garforth, to vacate his seat to
make room for him. To be superseded by one who afterwards became such a
celebrated statesman can hardly be considered a discredit. John Baynes
Garforth, up to middle life, lived in Cumberland, and afterwards in London,
where he was a solicitor. It is not certain that he ever lived at Steeton25.
He left an only son Thomas, who married26 Catherine, daughter of
the Rev. Robert Graham, of Netherby, and aunt to Sir James Graham, the
statesman. The Grahams were then, and are now, a family of great estate in
Cumberland; their seat was at Netherby, and are often alluded to by Sir Walter
Scott, the Grahams being a Border Clan. The Grahams are alluded to in the
following poem:-

Young
Lochinvar.

Oh! Young Lochinvar is
come out of the west,

Through all the wide
border his steed was the best;

And save his good
broadsword, he weapon had none,

He rode all unarmed,
and he rode all alone;

So faithful in love,
and so dauntless in war,

There never was knight
like the young Lochinvar.

He stayed not for
brake, he stopped not for stone,

He swam the Eske river
where ford there was none;

But ere he alighted at
NETHERBY GATE,

The bride had
consented, the gallant came late:

For a laggard in love
and a dastard in war

Was to wed the fair
Ellen of young Lochinvar. etc.

By his
marriage with a Graham, he is said to have got a considerable fortune. Soon
after his marriage he made fortunate purchases at Steeton. He bought land at
Redcar and at Eastburn, and he bought the Upper Hall and property with it
which had been the property of the Currers, and which about thirty years after
sold for more than three times its cost. By this purchase the Steeton estate
was nearly doubled in size and value. The following is an account of the
purchase27:-

Particulars
of Land, formerly the possessions of the Currers, bought by Thomas Garforth,
Esq., of Steeton Hall, from the devizes of the late Mrs. Hudson, about 1784-5

Names
of Occupiers

Names
of Fields

Day’s
Work

Rental

£
s.
d.

Little Wise

2

Great Wise

4

West Royd

2

Great Maw Redding

4

William
Greenwood

Little

Paddock

½

Pott

4

Great
Scaleholm

7

Little

5

Lavarac Holme

4

35

33
4
0

Kelk

10

Harewood Hill

Lower and Upper Closes

5

William
Smith

Moor Close

Brows

7

Rough
Ing

4

Edge Croft

33½

30
5
0

Little Barrows

Great

6


Little Coppy

8

Great

12

Christopher
Witton

Little Rough

2

Great

8

Moor Close

7

In the West Ings

8

Sheep Pastures

6

Great Fowl Syke

6

65½

55
0
0

Back Side

½

Upper Cote Close

2

Lower

3

Colonels Close

4

Stephen
Wade

Gully Grass

Little Cote Close

2

Near Close

2

Orchard End

3

In the Stone Bridge

4

Thornholme

2

24

19
3
0

Upper Horstead and Garth

3

Yawmires

6

John
Asquith, junr.

Trankers Butts

2

Jane Ing

Crofts and Mill Croft

17

16
13
0

Croft

3

Kid Croft

1

Larelands

1

Stonebrigg Head

2

New Close

5

Great Broady Lands

6

John
Lund

In Little

3

Pudding

5

Great Summer Hill

Little

1

The Two Heads

Pighills

Redding

42

34
10
0

Brian
Dale

Lower Horstead

5

Crofts and Mill Croft

1

6

6
6
0

Jane Croft

3

Great Bent Close

4

Little and Low Bent Close

4

John
Asquith, senr.

Backside

½

Little Fowl Syke

3

In the West Ings

In Bridgeholme

18¼

17
0
0

John
Longbottom

Yawmire Legs

7

6
15
0

Blind Pool

Widow
Whitaker and John Moorhouse

Two
Cottages

2
8
0

Devizes
of the late Mrs. Hudson

Great Wood,
Low Close Wood, Shroggs Wood, Redding Wood, House,
Garden, and sundry Outbuildings.


Total

248¼

£221
4
0

This
estate with a rental of £221 4s. 0d. was bought for £7500 in 1784-5-6.

Also
soon after the marriage, they took up their residence at Steeton Hall, where
they continued to live until the time of his death in 1811. It was he that
made alterations about the hall. About this time (1780-90) the ornamental wall
on Hawkcliffe top was erected; the carriage drive going in at the Chinese
gates was made; the cascades were laid out, which were then teeming with fish;
he pulled down several cottages in the field in which the church now stands;
he also pulled down several cottages on each side of the brook below the
bridge, near the corn-mill; he laid out the Flats, and he planted a great many
trees in the village.

Before
then, the Flats28 consisted of a lot of two or three acre fields,
but after then it consisted of one piece of fifty-nine acres. It was bounded
by the river, the hall, and the Elm Farm; the present Park House Farm was part
of the Old Flats, and that row of trees going down to Park House are supposed
to have been planted with the intention of have an entrance to the hall there.
However, Steeton Hall was sold to the Sugdens in 1819, who afterwards carved
down the Flats to its present dimensions of about 29 acres. Park House was
built by Mr. William Sugden about 1832, and derived its name from the park of
the hall extending so near to it. Park House, with 22 acres of land, was
bought by the late Mr. Joseph Craven, of the Exors. of Mr. William Sugden in
1840.

Most
people have heard the old people talk of the Chinese Gates; they were the
principal entrance to Steeton Hall, and were situated between the Star Inn and
the beck. The drive went from the road to the hall parallel to the beck; it is
now grown over with grass, but it can be traced by looking over the wall. Soon
after the new road was made to the station, about the year 1828, the drive
leading from the Chinese Gates was done away with, and the present one that
enters the road opposite the Summerhill Lane was made.

There
must have been a house somewhere where Steeton Hall now stands for seven
hundred years, as Raino de Stiveton was witness to a grant of land by the
family of Allerton to Kirkstall Abbey about the year 1190; but the present
house cannot go further back than a little over two hundred years. The Prior
of Bolton gave a charter to Elias de Stiveton to celebrate divine service in
his chapel at Steeton in the thirteenth century. This chapel is supposed to
have been a domestic oratory, and probably gives rise to the tradition that a
small field, now thrown into a larger field at the back of the hall, formerly
was a burial ground. Upon the present house are the following inscriptions:-


The arms
of the Garforth family are:- Sa. A
bend between six goats passant argent;
Crest, out of a mural coronet arg.
a goat’s head of the last. As the goat’s head was the crest of the Garforths,
this evidently accounts for the name of one of the public-houses. From the
above dates it is evident that the hall was completely rebuilt in the
seventeenth century (Michael Ogden might be the builder or the mason who
worked the stone on which his name is), and it is the recollection of most
people that half of it was rebuilt in 1863, when the late Mr. John Craven took
it on a lease. Belonging to the house is a horn; about this horn there is
supposed to be a charm. The story is that if it were taken away, the ghosts of
departed owners of the place, and of suicides, of which it is known that two
have taken place inside the house, would make their appearance. In the flats,
in front of the house are the remains of a cock-pit, which will, no doubt,
have been the scene of many a fight.

The
above-mentioned Thomas Garforth was an active magistrate; he had been brought
up a barrister, though it is not known that he ever practised. This training
was of great advantage to him as a magistrate; he presided when present, and
his decisions carried weight with them. This accounts for him being generally
called “Justice Garforth.” Many a culprit has received his sentence from
him at the hall or at the “Goat.” Then was ample scope for his abilities,
for in 1793 war broke out against France. It was during these times that the
village was a busy centre; enlisting and balloting was carried out with vigour
the length and breadth of the land, and a great part of the balloting for the
district of Craven was performed at Steeton. Ten years later, another French
war broke out; Napoleon had assembled a great flotilla at Boulogne, and was
threatening to invade England. Every town and village was astir; Craven
mustered 1400 volunteers called the “Craven Legion,” of which Lord
Ribblesdale was Colonel and Mr. Thomas Garforth was Lieutenant-Colonel.

A month
was spent at York every year with his regiment for training, and in the
intermediate time the men were frequently called to exercise. More than once
might have been seen three hundred men drawn up in the park in front of the
old mansion accompanied by a band of music. At one time the whole of the
officers of the Craven Legion were banqueted in the large dining-room when the
band of the regiment was playing.

Mr.
Garforth kept a pack of hounds, kept gamekeepers, and lived in a fashion more
resembling a nobleman than a country squire; it may be said that he resembled
the “fine old English gentleman, one of the olden time.” His hospitality
was great; strangers that called there were rarely sent empty away. Any caller
was generally greeted: “sit down, friend;” a pitcher with eatables was
brought, and many a thirsty person has had the jug more than once refilled.
This was not an isolated case.

Instead
of retrenchment he had more servants, erected hot-houses, and put two more
horses to his carriage. Old Jonathan writes:- “it was a fine sight to us in
our younger days to see Mr. Garforth’s carriage pass on their way to church;
the footman, coachman, and postillion all in new white liveries faced with
scarlet, and the carriage drawn by four beautiful bright bay horses.”

This
continued a short time. In 1810 property was sold of the value of £18,000,
which extricated him from his difficulties. During his embarrassed
circumstances his health broke down both physically and mentally. He died the
following year, December 6th, 1811, aged 56 years. He was buried in the
chancel of Kildwick Church, where a tablet29 is now to be read to
his memory. On the same day there were two funerals from Steeton Hall – the
squire and old butler; both ended their days about the same time; the master
was buried inside the church in the morning, and the servant in the yard in
the afternoon. He was the last of the Garforths who was Lord of the Manor of
Steeton.

After
his death the whole of his remaining property was sold and divided among his
children, and the property that the family have since possessed was
repurchased at the sale. His eldest son was John James Garforth, who married
Sarah, the daughter of Mr. Thomas Pearson, of Steeton; he was born September
17th, 1791, and died December 21st, 1819. His son Thomas married a daughter of
William Sugden, Esq., of Eastwood House, and was born in 1818, and died June
16th, 1853 (the present Mr. Garforth is his son). A pedigree of the family is
in Whitaker’s History of Craven.

––––––––––––––

Particulars
of Land sold at Steeton belonging to T. Garforth, Esq., June 19th and
20th, 1810.

Description
of Property.

A.

R.

P.

£

s.

d.

Low
Close Farm – Two Brows

6

2

39


Little Brow

1

0

17


Moor Close and 2 long fields

3

3

39


Harewood Hill and Ing

6

0

14


Wood Close

3

3

26


11 Allotments

3

3

26

2450

0

0

Bought
by J. Greenwood, of Keighley.


Currer Wood

31

3

37


Law Close Taws

4

1

34


Small field adjoining wood

0

3

8

3220

0

0


One field

5

1

2

401

0

0

Bought
by J. Greenwood, of Keighley.


Redding Wood

5

1

5

402

0

0

Bought
by Benjamin Blakebrough.


Great and Little Coppys

13

0

36


Barrows and Rough Ing

13

1

36

1815

0

0

Bought
by James Craven, Steeton.


Little Broady Lands

1

2

21

160

0

0

Bought
by James Craven, Steeton.


Great Broady Lands

4

3

5

487

0

0

Bought
by J. Greenwood, of Keighley.


Cockshott Dam Green

107

0

4

905

0

0

Bought
by E. Smith, of Keighley.


Two Whitefields

15

2

21

430

0

0

Bought
by Thomas Smith, of Keighley.


Three Allotments

55

3

7

502

0

0

Bought
by J. Greenwood, of Keighley.

One-third
part of the Rectorial Tithes of the parish of Kildwick, held under the
Dean and Chapter of Christ Church College, Oxford, by the usual
college lease renewable.

 

 

1571

 

 

0

 

 

0

Bought
by T. Pearson, J. Bairstow, A. Binns, and J. Ellison

Nut
Head Farm – 3 Nuthead Allotments

11

1

8


West Bank Allotments

5

2

35


One field

1

2

16


Plantation

10

3

0

840

0

0

Bought
by John Ellison, of Keighley.


Fowl Syke

4

1

35

505

0

0

Bought
by William Paget, of Utley.


5 Allotments and Plantation included

8

3

24


Redding

2

0

0

520

0

0

Bought
by J. Parkinson, of Barwick.


Bolton Fields

4

1

26

  


Seed Hill

2

0

0

  


House, Barn, and Garden

0

1

26

650

0

0

Bought
by J. Bairstow, of Steeton.

  


Thornholme

1

1

37

183

0

0

Bought
by Edward Brumfitt, of Addingham.

  


Stonebridge

3

1

10

344

0

0

Bought
by J. Bairstow, of Steeton.

  


Old Star Inn, Barn, Stables and Gardens

402

0

0


Jane Croft

2

1

18

318

0

0


Great Bent Close

3

0

15

457

0

0

Bought
by J. and A. Wilkins, of Steeton.

  


Little Bent Close

1

0

9

152

0

0

Bought
by William Laycock, of Keighley.

  


Pickhill Close and Heads

3

1

8

424

0

0

Bought
by John Bairstow, of Steeton.

  


Carter Royds

1

2

0

  


Heads

2

3

7

600

0

0

Bought
by John Peel, of Keighley.


Summerhill Close

2

0

25

  


Duddings

3

1

8

655

0

0

Bought
by Dennis Davy, of Steeton.

  


Little Fowl Syke

2

0

25

342

0

0

Bought
by John Smith, Woodside.

  

394

3

13

£18735

0

0

Property
of the late Thomas Garforth, Esq., sold December 16th, 1818.

Description
of Property.

A.

R.

P.

£

s.

d.


Red Lion Inn, Eastburn

ì
19

1

12


Allotment

î
12

3

15

1850

0

0


Elm Farm

39

2

28

2380

0

0


Two Cote Closes

4

1

6

400

0

0


Two Bracelets

6

3

34

545

0

0


Timber on the above

105

7

0

Bought
by Thos. Garforth, jun, of Steeton.

J.
Bland bought Waste in Eastburn

0

0

8

29

0

0


Glusburn Moor and Manor

90

1

25

1550

0

0


Upper Hall, etc.

130

1

34

6250

0

0


Timber on the above

155

0

0

Bought
by Mr. John Garforth, of Steeton.


Hollings
30

100

3

39

4000

0

0


Two Intakes

8

3

33

305

0

0


Gill Wood

6

3

14

524

0

0


Barrows

2

3

30

250

0

0


Reddings

6

0

8

379

0

0


Wood on the above

31

9

0

Bought
by Mr. B. Blakebrough, Hollings.


Five fields at the Heights

6

3

33

465

0

0


Timber on the above

20

17

0

Bought
by Thomas Booth, Howden.


Houses, Warehouses, and Gardens

600

0

0

Bought
by Thomas Pearson, Steeton.


Two Cottages and Gardens

0

1

13

65

0

0

Bought
by Jonas Dale, Steeton.


Gamersgill Farm

1260

0

Bought
by R.B. Wainman, Esq., Carrhead.


Surgill Farm

37

2

10

630

0

0

Bought
by Thomas Smith, Keighley


Warley Wise Farm

101

0

0

1600

0

0

Bought
by – Whitaker

575

2

22

£23394

13

0

Property
of the late Thos. Garforth, Esq., sold
31
Oct. 16th, 1819.

Description
of Property.

A.

R.

P.

£

s.

d.


New Ing

6

0

0

422

0

0

Bought
by Thomas Booth, Howden.


New Ing

4

0

0

264

0

0

Bought
by John Craven, Keighley.


Little Long Lands

3

3

8

300

0

0

Bought
by Benjamin Blakebrough


New Ing

6

0

0

425

0

0

Bought
by John Mitchell, Keighley.


Jackey Croft and Barn

2

3

0

450

0

0


Jane Ing and Trankers

10

0

0

670

0

0


Broadholmes, Park, Hall &c., and Manor included

133

1

35

11800

0

0


Timber

800

0

0


Allotments

7

3

9

220

0

0

Bought
by William Sugden, Keighley.

  


Croft and House

1

2

0

261

4

0

Bought
by Midgley Rishworth, Steeton.

  


Goat’s Head Inn, &c.

31

1

8

1933

7

0


Wood Close

3

0

0

220

0

0

Bought
by Thomas Pearson, Steeton.


Corn Mill, &c.

149

0

0

3000

0

0


Stonebridge

  

50

0

0

Bought
by John Bairstow, Steeton.

  

  


High Hawkcliffe Wood

38

1

0


Low

5

1

11

3100

0

0

Bought
by William Waite, near Leeds.


Hawkcliffe Farm

42

3

38


Wiggan’s Wood

2

2

22

2150

0

0

Bought
by James Greenwood, Bridge House.


Tranker

3

2

22

230

0

0

Bought
by Betty Smith, Keighley.

  

451

1

33

£26645

11

0


A.    R.
P.
£
s.
d.

394      3
13      was
sold in   1810 and realized
18735
0
0


575      2
22

1818

23394
13
0


451      1
33


1819

26645
11

1421
3    28

£68775
4

A short
description of the village as it now is will be of interest to all who live at
Steeton.

In going
to the station, almost everyone has noticed that the road is close to the
houses at the top, but at the bottom it will be perhaps ten yards distant;
this was not the case formerly, the road was straight with the houses, went
straight down through what is now the plantation belonging to the hall, within
a few yards to the east of the hall stables, and then passed close to the
dog-kennels. Over the door of the dog-kennels is the inscription, EEG 1709,
which means Edmund and Elizabeth Garforth. Going towards the Old Bank there is
above a house door –

 

G

E
E

1710

 

 

Edmund and
Elizabeth Garforth.

This
house is supposed to have been the Goat’s Head Inn32 previous to
its removal to its present position; it is probable it would be removed when
the road was cut through Hawkcliffe. In the yard belonging to the Goat’s Head
Inn there is –

 

Rebuilt

I
G
A G

18
T P   27

1689

 

 

Jennet Garforth and
Anthony Garforth33.

This
building was first erected in 1689 and then rebuilt by Thomas Pearson in 1827
who had purchased it in 1819 at one of the sales of the estate. To return to
the old road to Silsden, it then, about the dog-kennels, took a sharp turn
towards where the station now stands and crossed over to Silsden. The present
road to the station was made, and the one just mentioned done away with, about
the year 1826.

The
railway from Keighley to Skipton was opened in September, 1847; those of the
present younger generation can hardly realize the changes that a railway
brings into a neighbourhood.

The
bridge over the river Aire is not a very old bridge; it was built a.d.
1804-5-6. Steeton Bridge or Silsden Bridge as it is differently called, first
became a county bridge a.d.
1804; it was built by the county authorities at a cost of £3529 7s. 10¾d.
Mr. Benjamin Muschamp was the builder. On April 18th, 1803, it was ordered
that the bridge be built according to the plan of Mr. Hartley, the surveyor,
and the estimate be referred to Mr. Garforth, Rev. Chas. Knowlton, Clerk, Mr.
Wickham, and Mr. Busfield, justices of the peace, to contract with workmen for
building the same.

Previous
to the present bridge being made, carts and waggons had to ford the river at
the place called “The Streams,” which is a place in the river a little
above the present bridge34. There was a sod in the river at the
ford; if the sod was covered with water, it was unsafe to cross the ford, and
carts laden from Ilkley, Otley, Wharfedale, etc., (it is said that Steeton was
supplied with flour from Otley in those days) had to go round by Kildwick
Grange and Kildwick. Kildwick Bridge was in existence five hundred years
before Steeton Bridge; it was first built in the reign of Edward II by the
Canons of Bolton, and was widened by the county authorities a.d.
1780. For foot-passengers there was a bridge over the river about where the
Steeton beck enters the river now; stones may be seen in the bed of the river
which formed its foundations.

The
footbridge was in existence as far back as a.d.
1648; it was repaired July, 1648 and 1681. In the year 1784, plans were made
for a carriage bridge to be made by the township, a gratuity being allowed by
the county. This bridge was a timber structure and was superseded by the
present bridge. a.d. 1802 the
footway between Addingham and Steeton was diverted.

The
oldest road in Steeton is the Old Bank, and the bridge at its foot is probably
the oldest bridge. The erection of this bridge is not known, it was in
existence in 1752, it must be very old because the Old Bank was formerly the
main road, which it has not been for the last 100 years. The road through
Hawkcliffe was made a.d.
1780-2, and from a comparison of the two roads, it is certain that after the
Hawkcliffe road was made the Old Bank would cease to be much used.

The new
road from Utley Green Head through Hawkcliffe to Steeton was made a.d.
1782 at great expense for greater convenience for travellers. In April, 1782,
a bridleway from Dark Lane Top through Low Utley to Dogkennel within the
township of Steeton, was stopped and diverted on account of the new road being
made. The bridleway was considered dangerous in many parts for travellers, and
the new road was both nearer and more commodious. The length of the bridleway
from Dark Lane Top to Dogkennel was 2 miles, 6 furlongs, 35 yards, and the
road through Utley Green Head and Hawkcliffe was 2 miles, 5 furlongs, 30
yards, and 30 feet broad.

Portions
of pavement are to be seen near the top of the Old Bank yet; it is conjectured
by some that the pavement dates back to the Roman period, but it was also a
custom in the olden time to pave parts of a road where it was likely to be
washed away by the rain, so that to pave was the more economical.

In
Carey’s English Atlas which was published January 1st, 1793, and which
contains maps of each county, the view from Steeton Bank, S. of Skipton, is
mentioned to be one of the principal scenes in the West Riding of Yorkshire.
The fact that Steeton Bank was mentioned among the extensive views of
Yorkshire is a proof that this road has been the highway, or otherwise it
would probably have never been so known. The present highway from the Lion
lane end, Eastburn, to Steeton was made 1785-90.

There
has been a bridge where Eastburn Bridge now is for a long time. A bridge was
destroyed by floods 1642. It was rebuilt about 1647, and again rebuilt a.d.
1738. At several different times it has been altered and repaired. The road at
each end was raised and repaired July, 1789, and the ramparts at each end were
repaired at the same time. Eastburn bridge became a county bridge a.d.
1820. Previous to a.d. 1797 the
county authorities had expended on it £670. When the bridge near the
corn-mill was first erected is not known, but in the Original Survey of all
bridges in the Riding taken by J. Westerman and J. Gott, 1752, there
was a bridge here.

The part
of Eastburn called “The Lion” takes its name from an old public-house35
that used to be situated near where Mrs Wilson’s house now stands; it has
been rebuilt upon the same ground. The public-house was called the “Red
Lion,” and when the road that passes through Eastburn was made, the inn was
transferred to where the public-house now is. The reason that there are two
“White Bear” Inns, one at Crosshills and the other at Eastburn, so near
together is this: The road from the “Junction” to Kildwick was cut 1825;
James Slack, then living at the “White Bear” Inn, Crosshills, removed to
the “Red Lion” Inn, Eastburn; he thought the road from the “Junction”
to Kildwick would diminish his business at Crosshills, so he changed the name
of the Eastburn public-house from “Red Lion” to “White Bear,” as he
thought by doing this he would better secure his old connection. The building
now forming the principal part of the “White Bear” was built by the
executors of Thomas Charles Garforth about 1825, and the old part behind it,
now standing, was the old “Red Lion.” The present owner of the inn is Mr.
John T. Ramsden, of Jumples, near Halifax.

In
Carey’s Itinerary, 1798, the only public-house mentioned at Steeton is
“The Pack Horse.” The cottages at the foot of the Old Bank now owned by
John and William Sugden, then forming the inn, brewhouse, dogkennels, etc.,
most probably was “The Pack Horse.” This block of buildings was purchased
by John Asquith, Feb. 15th, 1820, of Sir James Graham, Bart., surviving
trustee under the will of John Baynes Garforth. William Sugden, father of the
present owners, bought them Sept. 4th, 1835. The Inn would probably be done
away with a.d. 1782-5.

Until a.d.
1790 the road to Kildwick would be down Pot Lane, and past “The Lion.”
Near a field, now called Nanny Grave Hill, there were four lanes ends; there
are three lane ends yet; there was what is called Devil’s Lane, the lanes
towards Eastburn and Steeton, and Wood Street. Wood Street is now a thing of
the past; it joined the road at the four lane ends, and took straight up the
hill; the name of Mr. John Rishworth’s house is all that reminds the
present generation of its existence. Wood Street House with 23 acres of land
was sold to Mr. J. Dixon, of Cononley, October, 1885.

The
junction of these four lane ends is the scene of one of Steeton’s tragedies.
At this place is buried a suicide called Nanny, with a stake
in her inside.
Some people point out the mound under which she is buried.
When the suicide took place is not known, but it would certainly not occur
later than the seventeenth century.

The Elm
Farm-house was one of the oldest buildings in Steeton, it has now been razed
to the ground, one of the landmarks of ancient Steeton thus being swept away.
Above its front door was –

 

H
C      A
C

1672

 

 

Hugh and
Ann Currer.

This
stone has been inserted into the new farm-house which was built in 1884 about
300 yards to the south-east of the old farm buildings. Above the back door of
the High Hall are the same initials, only it was built by the same people two
years later:

 

H
C      A
C

a.d.
1674

 

 

On
another part of the High Hall is –

 

W
C

Civis
Londini

1705

 

 

William Currer,
Citizen of London.

Thus the
house would be first erected in 1674, and enlarged and altered in 1705 by
William Currer. In the north garden wall there has been placed a stone which
was formerly in a blank window of a building adjoining the Goat’s Head Inn.
Upon this stone is –

 

I
B  G

Esquire

1672

 

 

John Baynes
Garforth

John
Baynes Garforth lived the latter part of his life in Brainstone Street,
Portman Square, London, and died October, 1808. He was the second son of Ralph
and Elizabeth Baynes36, his mother being sister to Thomas Garforth,
of Steeton Hall. His uncle, Thomas Garforth, died a bachelor a.d.
1743, leaving all his real estate to him on condition that he and his
heirs-male took the name of Garforth. J.B. Garforth’s estate consisted a.d.
1751, of the manor of Steeton-cum-Eastburn and Glusburn, 20 messuages, 1
water corn-mill, 18 gardens, 150 acres of land, 150 acres of meadow land, 150
acres of pasture land, 20 acres of wood, 150 acres of furze and heath, 500
acres of moor common of pasture37, and one-third part of the
rectory of Gargrave; this property was inherited from his uncle and was
situated in the townships of Steeton-cum-Eastburn, Glusburn, Cowling Head, and
Gargrave.

Thomas
Garforth’s will is dated July 1st, 1738; William Currer, of Steeton; William
Garforth, of Gamsgill, Cowling Head; John Craven, of Levens, county
Westmoreland, being trustees. The entail was broken a.d.
1751, and J.B. Garforth by his will dated August 26th, 1808, leaves all his
property at Steeton and in Yorkshire on trust to William Wainman, of Carr
Head, and Sir James Graham, Bart., of Netherby, for the use of his son Thomas
Garforth for life, and then to be sold at his death, and the money arising
therefrom to be divided in equal shares among all his children. Thomas
Garforth, his son, died December, 1811, as it is stated previously.

It is
not known that J.B. Garforth ever lived at Steeton. In 1782 he was living in
London, and his wife was his agent at Steeton. During the time between his
uncle’s death and his son’s marriage a.d. 1743-80,
his elder brother, William Baynes, lived at Steeton Hall, to whose son’s
memory there is a tablet in Skipton Church. John Baynes, only son of the
aforesaid William Baynes36, lived at Skipton, and died January 3rd,
1820, aged 64. Embsay Kirk was built by William Baynes 1760-80, who was a
relation of the Baynes connected with Steeton.

The
sister of the last named John Baynes, Anne, married a Netherwood; she died
Dec. 8th, 1819, aged 63, and left a son Christopher Netherwood, who was living
at Steeton Hall a.d. 1822, then
the property of Mr. William Sugden. Mr. Christopher Netherwood afterwards
lived at Cliffe Hall, Keighley, which he built about a.d.
1833.

Over the
door of a house at the corn mill dam top is –

 

W
C

1710

 

 

consequently this house was
built by William Currer38. The Star Inn was formerly here until
about fifty years ago, when the present Star Inn was built, and the Wilkins,
who kept the house removed there. On the clock face at Kildwick Church is:-
“The gift of William Currer, of Steeton, late citizen of London, 1709.
Renewed by subscription, 1828. Redeem the Time.” The old clock at Kildwick
therefore was placed there by Steeton people. William Currer died 14th August,
1716, aged 72, and was interred in the chancel of Kildwick Church, where his
gravestone may be read at the present time.

The
Currers of Steeton were a younger branch of the Currers who lived at Kildwick
Hall for so long. Henry Currer bought the manor of Kildwick-in-Craven a.d.
1558, from a John Garforth39, or his son, of Farnhill; John
Garforth had bought the manor of Kildwick a.d.
1548, of Robert Wilkinson and Thomas Blake, of the parish of Halifax, to
whom it was granted by Henry VIII in 1541. No connection is traced between
John Garforth of Farnhill, and the Steeton family of that name.

The
Currers40 owned Kildwick until 1861, when the late Miss F.M.R.
Currer left the estate to her half-brother, the Rev. Henry Currer Wilson, at
whose death in 1866, Sir Mathew Wilson, Bart., became the owner. Hugh Currer,
the grandson of the above-mentioned Henry Currer of Kildwick, lived at
Steeton; he was born 1588, and died 1636. His son, another Hugh Currer, was
born 1621 and died 1670, and left a son William Currer. William Currer, as he
is often described as a citizen of London, must have spent a great part of his
life in that city. During that time his brother and nephew, both Hugh Currers,
lived at Steeton. The last Hugh Currer of Steeton was born 1672 and died 1738,
leaving a son William, who was born 1705, and probably died about 1745, for in
1748 the Hudsons had become the owners of the Currer Property, probably
through marriage. In the year 1726 the entail of the property was broken, Hugh
Currer, Bridget his wife, and William Currer, son and heir-apparent, being
parties to the agreement.

Mrs. Ann
Hudson was the owner in 1782, and John Asquith was her agent. Mrs. Ann Hudson
lived in Lincolnshire, at Glamford Briggs, in the parish of Wrawby. After Mrs.
Ann Hudson, the owners were William Holgate, of Thorganby, county Lincoln;
Isabella Hudson, of Thorganby, spinster; and Josiah Prickett, of Hull, gent.,
and Sarah his wife, who sold the Upper Hall and other property in the
township. The property was sold 1786, which sale is described on pages 12 and
13. The Currers and then Hudsons were owners of the Upper Hall and a part of
the township of Steeton 1605-7 to 1786.

About a
century ago, besides the lord of the manor, proprietors of land in Steeton
were the Davys, the Rishworths and the Stirks.

The
first purchase made by the Davys was the farm at Whitley Head now belonging to
Mr. J.W. Shackleton, to whom it has come by descent, his maternal
grandmother being a daughter of William Davy who lived a Holmes House, and
died May 20th, 1802, aged 57. He was found dead in the canal at Silsden, his
head was bruised, but how his death was caused was not made out. The first
purchase was made a.d. 1649.
Over the doorway at the entrance to the garden behind Holmes House is —

 

W
D

1764

 

 

William
Davy.

At that
time it was the property of the Davys. At the corner of the plantation
opposite the corn mill there formerly was a small plot of ground that belonged
to the Davys; on this, it is said, there used to be a public-house, and
afterwards a stable. There were also some cottages on the beckside which have
been cleared away. The corner of the plantation was either bought or exchanged
by the owner of the hall on the condition that the trees and shrubs planted
should be kept trimmed and below a certain height in order to improve the view
from the house. The trees then planted are now tall forest trees.

The
above William Davy built Whitley Head House probably about a.d.
1780-90; his daughter Elizabeth having married Jonas Slack, it became their
property; William Slack, their son, sold it and built the row of houses that
has since been known as “Slack Row.” Mr. Joseph Wright purchased the
property a.d. 1846. He sold it
February, 1864, to Mr. William Clough, who had taken Whitley Head House on a
lease for twelve years, March, 1854, who now lives there, and by whom the
house and gardens have been enlarged and the carriage drive made.

Holmes
House became the property of Denis Davy, eldest son of the above William; from
him it came to the Claphams, Pauline, his daughter, having married Mr. Joshua
Clapham, of Utley. It has since been purchased by Mr. Wm. Dixon.

The name
of John Davy appears a.d. 1544
on the court-rolls, and as this is before there were any freeholders in
Steeton, the Davys would be tenants in Steeton for a considerable time
previous to becoming proprietors. William Davy was a tenant a.d.
1583. There were an Alice Davy and her son William owners of land at Steeton a.d.
1660, and a Dennis Davy a.d.
1690. Dennis Davy, who died Dec. 6th, 1840, aged 60, may be said to have been
the last. In 1822 his estate in Steeton consisted of 147 acres, and was valued
at £168 0s. 0d. They were a Quaker family, a great proportion of their births
and marriages being in the Keighley Quakers’ Register, and their burial
place was at Calversyke Hill.

Alice
Davy41, of Whitley Head, Steeton, widow; Dennis or Dionis Davy,
blacksmith or locksmith (he is styled blacksmith in one place and locksmith in
another); and William Davy, eldest son of Dennis and Alice Davy, bought
Whitley Head Farm (then in the occupation of Alice Davy, and consisting of
land now belonging to J.W. Shackleton, and part of the property now farmed by
John Curtis) of William Garforth, of Steeton, gentleman, and Anthony Garforth,
of Steeton, his son and heir-apparent, April 24th, 1649, for £160.

The
purchase was confirmed by William and Anthony Garforth, July 20th, 1659, and
again confirmed by William Garforth, son of the aforesaid Anthony, Oct. 10th,
1660. In the deed of 1660, three more closes of land are mentioned, and that
there is common of pasture on the more for all stock kept on the farm.

William,
son of William and Elizabeth Davy (Elizabeth Davy married for her second
husband, James Ramsden, of Braithwaite), grandson of Dennis and Alice Davy, is
owner of the property a.d. 1690.
At that time (1690) there were an old house and a new house on each side of
the fold at Whitley Head consequently the house at Whitley Head now in
existence was built a.d.
1685-90. He died a.d. 1692,
and was buried at Calversyke Hill.

His son,
another William Davy42 (there were three Williams in succession),
married at Henry Wood’s house, Dec. 5th, 1690, Hannah Roberts, daughter of
Daniel Roberts, of Cononley, linen weaver (Hannah Davy died a.d.
1737). This William Davy, of Whitley Head, bought property43 (10
acres) of Edmund Garforth, March, 1709, for £110 7s. 0d. The property was
situated at Whitley Head. His sister, Elizabeth married a.d.
1690, Jeremy Brigg, of Calversyke Hill. He died Feb. 19th, 1747, aged 81,
leaving all his land eventually to his son David Davy. The land was situated
at Whitley Head, a close of land lying at Steeton Bridge called Longholme, and
he had land at Carleton.

David
Davy44, of Whitley Head, bought, Nov., 1748, of four or five
different people property at Steeton, consisting of seven closes of land (14
days’ work), and which a short time previous was the estate and inheritance
of John Gregson, gentleman, of Manningham, from whom the vendors had inherited
it. David Davy died a.d. 1762,
aged 47, leaving his property in the parishes of Kildwick and Keighley to his
son William; his property at Lothersdale to his daughter Mary; and property at
Carleton and Giggleswick to his daughter Ann.

William,
son of the aforesaid David Davy and Francis his wife, died a.d.
1802, leaving his property at Steeton to his son Dennis, and his property in
the parishes of Keighley and Carleton to his son David Davy. Thomas Brigg, of
Guard House, and John Spence, of Newbridge, Forest of Knaresborough, were his
executors.

William
Davy, another son of the aforesaid William, left his property at Whitley Head
to his sisters Sarah Robinson and Elizabeth Slack at his death, 1818, as
tenants in common.

Eventually
the property was divided; the farm now belonging to Mr. J.W. Shackleton
becoming his grandmother’s (Mrs. Robinson), and the farm now belonging to Mr
W. Clough becoming the property of the Slacks.

The
property of Dennis Davy at Steeton came to the Claphams by marriage, and has
since been sold.

Above
Whitley Head there is a gill which has been named Brighton, because formerly,
on account of the excellence of the water that runs through it, baths were
built there. There were two small plunge baths and a shower bath; a penny each
was charged for the shower bath, and sixpence and fourpence were charged for
the others, one being larger than the other. During the time that the baths
were in operation, they were looked after by John and Betty Jackson, who lived
at Whitley Head. They were in operation from about a.d.
1843 to 1849, and were much frequented; but when the railway was made the
number of visitors to Brighton fell away so that it was not worth while
keeping them in repair. The larger bath was about 10-ft. by 7ft. The buildings
and baths have since been taken away; a well that was near was also taken away
when the two reservoirs were made in 1878.

At
Brighton there are quarries, the stone of which has been sent a long distance;
they were worked by William Tillotson and Smith Jackson. The one worked by
William Tillotson produced the better stone; delvers worked at it from about a.d.
1847 to 1881, during which time the following buildings were of this stone:-
Gargrave Church; Baptist Chapel, Skipton; interior of the Catholic Church,
Lancaster; Catholic Church, Convent, and Schools, Skipton; tracery windows,
Bradford Exchange; Newfield Hall; Carleton Church; Kelbrook Church; Caton
Church; Hoddlesden Church, near Over Darwen; part of Tarn House, Malham; Mr.
Craven’s house at Hawkcliffe; The Shroggs, etc. A great quantity of stone
was sent to Settle, Barrow, Morecambe, etc., good stone being scarcer in that
direction than in the neighbourhood of Keighley and Bradford.

Of the
antiquity of the Rishworth family we have evidence in the date over the door
of one of the houses in Station Row:

 

T
R  E

1732

 

 

Thomas and
Elizabeth Rishworth.

 These
houses have come down by descent to their present owners. The Rishworth
property extended more towards Eastburn, some of it was lately owned by Mr.
John Rishworth, and some of it has been sold these last few years to the
Teals.

The
Rishworth property45 was bought a.d.
1704. Stephen Moorhouse, of Eastburn, son and heir of John Moorhouse, of
Eastburn, who was in possession of the property, March, 1687, sold about 55
acres of land, two dwelling houses and two barns to William Rishworth, of
Gilgrange, September, 1704. William Rishworth had property at Addingham
moorside in addition to his property at Eastburn.

Thomas
Rishworth, son of the preceding, gave certain land to his son Thomas, and gave
to his youngest son William all his property in Eastburn and Steeton. The
aforesaid Thomas lived at Thwaites, and died a.d.
1772.

William
Rishworth46, of Eastburn, died a.d.
1811, and his sons William, John, Thomas, Midgley, and Samuel inherited
different properties. Thomas Rishworth, who was the father of Wm. and John
Rishworth, got the Eastburn property and the allotments enclosed from the moor
(Outmoor or Clarke’s Allotment).

John47,
father of the late Thomas Rishworth, of Steeton, tailor, inherited property at
Steeton, part of which is still owned by his family. Mr. Thomas Rishworth, of
Silsden Moor, and Messrs. Clapham, Henry, and Israel Rishworth, corn-millers,
of Keighley, are the sons of Midgeley Rishworth.

The
Stirks48 lived at the Hobhill; above the door is –

 

H
S

1720

 

 

Henry
Stirk.

This
stone was inserted in the new house when it was rebuilt in 1854. By the
marriage of Mr. Thomas Pearson in 1788 with Ann, daughter of Henry Stirk, the
Hobhill passed to the Pearsons. In 1822, Mr. Thomas Pearson was the owner of
45 acres in Steeton valued at £77 0s. 0d. He died July 19th, 1851, aged 83
years, and was interred at Kildwick. It was purchased in 1848 by the late Mr.
John Clough who had married Jane, daughter of the aforesaid Thomas Pearson.
Mr. John Clough came to Steeton from Ingrow House, near Keighley; he died at
the Hobhill, January 25th, 1872, aged 80, and was buried in Keighley
Churchyard. The Shroggs was built in 1874 by Mr. Thomas Clough.

There
are a great many shops in Steeton now, but eighty years ago there were only
two shops, one kept by Nanny Whitaker in the lower houses of those near the
Primitive Methodist Chapel, and which was rebuilt in 1881. This house before
it was a shop is said to have been an old toll-bar when the road over the Old
Bank was the main road. The other shop was where the malt-kiln now is, and has
also been pulled down; this was Sarah Longbottom’s, an ancestor of the
Longbottoms now living in Steeton.

The two
cottage called “The Castle” were built by Barnard Green about 1817.
Barnard Green was the landlord of the Goat’s Head, and the houses got called
“Barney’s Castle,” and since have been known by the name of “The
Castle.”

Hawkcliffe
House was built about 1840 by James Brooks, copper moulder, of Keighley; it
was afterwards the property of the Barlows, and then purchased by the late Mr.
William Mitchell in 1867.

The
toll-bar ceased to be a toll-bar in 1878. In 1861, the man who lived at the
toll-bar, named Holdsworth, shot his wife from the bedroom window. His wife
and her brother were walking together on the footpath about thirty yards on
the Steeton side of the house, when the shot was fired which killed his wife.
It was not certainly known whether he was aiming at her or her brother. He was
found hiding on the moor; when he was tried he was brought in insane and
imprisoned for life.

The
house at Hawkcliffe where Miss Barlow and Miss Craven live was built in 1865,
and is the property of Mr. Joseph Craven, of Park House.

Hawkcliffe
Wood49, the beautiful scenery of which is known far and near, was
purchased by Mr. William Waite, of Leeds, in 1819. It was bought of him
by Messrs. Dixon, Oct. 8th, 1852, and sold in 1875 to Mr. H.I. Butterfield,
whose property it now is. The rugged scenery in the wood is concluded to have
been caused by a landslip. There is a cave in it that is
said
to lead to Bolton Abbey. On the top of the rock there is a footprint
and the initials of one of the Waites who
is said
to have leaped over the chasm.

Hawkcliffe
Cottage was erected by the Waites, living at a distance (they now live at
Crake Castle, near Easingwold); the cottage was built for them to live at when
they visited the wood.

The
foundation stone of the Church was laid by the Rev. Herbert Todd, M.A., vicar
of Kildwick, February 28th, 1880, the Rev. W. Mitchell, M.A., at present vicar
of St Luke’s, Bradford, being the curate at Steeton at the time. The vicar
died before the consecration of the church. It was consecrated by Dr.
Bickersteth, Bishop of Ripon, April 27th, 1881. The cost of the church,
including the ground on which it stood, was about £3700. It will seat about
270 people in addition to 30 children, and the seats are free and
unappropriated. Messrs. T.H. & F. Healey, of Bradford, were the
architects, and it was constructed by the following: masonry, Mr. J. Rhodes,
Shipley; joiner’s work, Mr. A. Wade, Silsden; plumber’s work, Mr T.
Lambert, Haworth; plasterer’s work, Mr. T. Riley, Sutton Mill; slater’s
work, Messrs. T. Thornton & Son; painter’s work, Mr. J. Hindle, Steeton.
The stone of which it is built was mostly got at Strike’s Delf above Sutton.
The east window is the work of Messrs. Powell Bros., Leeds; it is in memory of
the late Rev. Herbert Todd, and its cost was £280, toward which Mr. W. Clough
contributed £75. The organ was presented to the church by Miss Barlow and
Miss Craven, of Hawkcliffe. It was built by Mr. J.J. Binns, of Bramley, at a
cost of nearly £400, and it was opened November 17th, 1882. In January,
February, and March, 1884, the church was painted and decorated under the
direction of the architects by Mr. Jonathan Hindle, of Steeton. It was
re-opened March 15th, 1884. The church was appropriately dedicated to St.
Stephen, Stephen being the name of the first Saxon possessor of Steeton, from
whom the village first got its name.

In
December, 1881, the township of Steeton-with-Eastburn was made a separate
parish for all ecclesiastical purposes, and the Rev. C.I.W. Boynton, M.A., who
was acting as curate, became the first vicar on the presentation of the Rev.
F.W. Greenstreet, M.A., vicar of Kildwick.

From
October, 1869, to 1881, the services of the Church of England were held in a
wooden building situate on Keighley Road near Carter Royd House. The structure
has been removed to near the new church, and is now used as a schoolroom.

Formerly
there were more houses about where the church now is situate, which have been
pulled down at different periods; then “Little London” was more the centre
of the village.

The
Wesleyan Chapel was built in 1826, and the schoolroom that adjoins it in 1872;
previous to the chapel being built, a building that has since been a shop and
is now two cottages, in Barrows Lane, was a chapel50.

The
Primitive Methodist Chapel situate at the foot of the Old Bank was built in
1850.

The
Provident Day School51 was begun February 9th, 1852, Mr. Joseph
Wade, the present master, being the first teacher. It has no connection with
any religious denomination. In 1872, to meet the requirements of the Education
Department, it was enlarged, which nearly doubled its accommodation.

The
corn-mill is probably the oldest mill in Steeton; the erection of both it and
the mill that stood on the same site as that on which the bobbin-mill now is,
is unknown. Mr. John Bairstow, grandfather of the present Messrs. Thos. and
William Bairstow, was the tenant of the mill when he first came to Steeton; he
came from Ovenden, near Halifax, and after having repaired the mill, began
running a pair of stones January 30th, 1798. He bought the mill at the sale in
1819. Mr. John Bairstow died July 15th, 1837, aged 66, and was buried at
Kildwick.

The
bobbin mill formerly was a worsted mill, and before that it was a cotton mill.
For some time previous to a.d.
1797 it was run as a cotton mill by a firm of the name of Asquith and
Thompson. According to a deed dated 1st May, 1797, William Davy, gentleman, of
Steeton, bought one-third part of the machinery, utensils, etc., of Messrs.
William Marriner and William Sugden, of Keighley, trustees of Thompson, who
had become a bankrupt. On October 6th, 1802, John Bairstow, of Steeton,
corn-miller, Thomas Pearson, Steeton, piece-maker, and Abraham England, of
Broughton, corn-dealer, took all that cotton mill lately wrought by and in
possession of Mr. William Davy, from Dennis Davy, yeoman, Steeton, on a lease
for four years. Afterwards it was run as a worsted mill by the Pearsons; it
was bought in 1844 by the Dixons, who came from Glusburn, since which time it
has been a mill for making bobbins and other articles made from wood. It has
been altered and enlarged at different times there being now nothing left of
the old mill.

The firm
of Messrs. John Dixon and Sons consisted of Mr. John Dixon who is now living
and who was born Aug. 20th, 1795, Mr. William Dixon, and Mr Thos. O. Dixon who
died December, 1874, aged 48, and was buried at Sutton Chapel. Croft House was
built by Mr. T.O. Dixon a.d.
1864, in which house he afterwards lived, previous to that time he lived at
Wood Street House which was built 1852-3.

Another
Croft House, the residence of Mr. Wade, the schoolmaster, was built by Isaac
Longbottom a.d. 1822, and those
cottages to the west of the “Star” Inn were built by his elder brother,
John Longbottom, about a.d.
1818. John Longbottom, their father came into this neighbourhood a.d.
1783, from South Owram near Halifax. He was the husband of Sarah Longbottom
mentioned on page 25. He lived at Silsden a short time before Steeton, the
canal then was being made.

The
worsted mill was built by the Pearsons and began running in 1838. May 3rd,
1847, the mill and the Hobhill were purchased by the late Mr. John Clough. The
mill that was built in 1838 has been added to, 1852 and 1866. When they were
building the archway at the entrance a.d.
1852, a man named Samuel Mitchell, fell to the ground and died shortly
afterwards.

The
Cloughs have lived in the neighbourhood of Sutton for a long time. There have
been a family of Cloughs in Keighley Parish for several hundred years, it is
probable that the Sutton family were a branch of them. William Clough of
Oakworth Hall, in the parish of Keighley, yeoman, sold May 22nd, 1713, to
Robert Crabtree of Riddlesden, miller, Oakworth Hall and eight closes of land
then in the occupation of the said Wm. Clough. Over a door at Oakworth Hall
is:- W C 1702. There were Johannes de Cloghe, Nicholas del Clogh, and Elena de
Cloghe, living at Keighley a.d.
1379. Then there were no Cloughs living at Sutton.

The
first of the family of whom we have authentic record is John Clough, yeoman,
of Sutton Brow. The farm where he lived and which he owned is now sometimes
called Knowl Top, it is situate on Sutton Brow, on the opposite side of the
road to Long House, just within the district of Ayden. It is now the property
of Mr. John Brigg, of Kildwick Hall. Some years ago it was the property of the
Laycocks of Keighley who inherited it from the Briggs. Immediately previous to
a.d. 1630, the farm was in the
occupation of one William Harper, and in that year of John Clough the younger.

The
above John Clough was living a.d.
1630 and died a.d. 1647,
leaving a son.

John
Clough of Ayden married a.d.
1630, Ellen, daughter of William Pighills of the Lawnde in Stairs, parish of
Haworth. He had issue, John, born 1633, yeoman of Ayden 1661, and living at
Wrigglesworth a.d. 1668;
William, born 1637, living at Woodside, Kildwick, 1674, and 1690, but
afterwards of Carleton Biggin where he probably died 1699, leaving issue
besides others Timothy of Carleton; Robert and Michael.

The
aforesaid Robert Clough was born 1641 and died 1720. He married 1672,
Elizabeth Netherwood who died 1726. He along with his brother William bought
the Valley and Knowltop (now generally called Knowlcote), February 11th, 1674,
of John Brigg of Oxenhope, parish of Haworth, and Grace Brigg, his mother,
widow of John Brigg of Oxenhope. John Brigg was the son and the heir apparent
of John Brigg of Oxenhope, who was son and heir of Richard Brigg of Valley. A
Richard Brigg, pyper, of Valley, bought it from Alverley Copley, of Batley,
Esq., 7th April 1627; he sold the valley farm to Richard Brigg of Oxenhope,
2nd June, 1634, for £38 10s. Richard Brigg of Sutton bought 13th April, 1640,
for £28 10s. of Peter Barrett of Bent, and Stephen Barrett his younger
brother, a messuage called Knoll Top, etc., (now called Knowl Cote), then in
occupation of Stephen Barrett.

This
Robert Clough along with his brother William were the owners of Sutton Brow
Farm near Long House, Valley, and Knoll Top. These they divided September
25th, 1677, William obtaining Valley and Knowle Toppe and Robert the other
farm. Robert left two sons William and Robert.

Robert
born 1678, bought September 28th, 1704, for £60 from his cousin Timothy
Clough of Bigin Carleton, Valley and Knowl Toppe. He married Susan
———— who survived him, she died 1741. He died a.d.
1740 and left Valley and Knowl Top (Knowl Cote) to his nephew Robert. Will
dated 24th February, 1739.

William,
elder brother of the preceding, was born a.d.
1676 and married a.d. 1703
Martha Lister. He lived at Cononley, and sold his Farm on Sutton Brow for £272
2s. to David Brigg of Calversyke Hill, and Judith Brigg of Laycock, widow,
trustees of Thomas Brigg of Guard House, yeoman. He left several sons,
William, John, Joshua and Robert. Robert born 1716, died March 29th, 1801,
inherited Valley and Knowltop from his uncle. He married firstly Ann Cragg of
Steeton, widow, 1739, and secondly about 1777, Alice ———— who died
October 23rd, 1822, aged 75. The issue by his first wife were Robert, born at
Steeton 1740, William, born at Sutton 1747 probably died young, Joshua, born
1749 and died December 3rd 1835 aged 86, and John; by his second wife he had a
son William, of Knowl Top or Knowl Cote, who died May 11th, 1868, aged 85, he
married Hannah Cryer and left William of Market Street, Keighley, and others
who are now owners of Knowl Cote.

Robert
Clough of Sutton, yeoman, and Ann his wife sold 27th February, 1741, to Thomas
Garforth of Steeton, a cottage and garden at Steeton for £13 14s.; and two
closes at Sutton called Jackey and Snegill containing 6 days’ work.

Robert
born 1740 and died August 11th, 1821, had along with his brother Joshua, the
Valley farm given them by their father, 1776. He sold his half share to Joshua
1822; he lived at Long House and left issue.

Joshua,
of the Valley, married Margaret Stirk, who died March 5th, 1814, aged 53, and
left two sons, John Clough of Crosshills, died March 8th, 1859, aged 71, and
Robert, of the Valley, who died 19th September, 1854, aged 62. The present
house at the Valley was built 1820-22. For a considerable time previous to
that there had been only a laithe, the old house having disappeared. (In 1776
there was no house.)

The
present Mr. John Edward Clough, of the Valley, is the only son of Robert
Clough.

John
Clough of the Bent, which he purchased December 22nd, 1798, the Rev. Stephen
Barrett, M.A., Rector of Hothfield, Kent, being then the owner, married Jane
Leach of Silsden Moor, who died April 5th, 1828, aged 75.

The
family of Barrett were located at the Bent for a long time, there was a
William Barrett who lived there 1599. Peter Barrett, of the Bent was buried at
Kildwick 1653.

On a
stone inserted in the wall at the Bent is:-

 

1658

W
A B

 

 

William and
Ann Barrett

The
name of Barrett occurs often from the beginning of the parish registers. The
last of the Barretts of the Bent was the Rev. Stephen Barrett. From the Gentleman’s
Magazine
December 1801, is extracted the following:-

“He
was born at Bent, in the parish of Kildwick, and received his education at the
Grammar School, Skipton, thence he went to University College, Oxford, where
he took the degree of M.A., and received Holy Orders. In 1773 he was appointed
to the rectory of Hothfield by the Earl of Thanet. He married a.d.
1749, Mary, the daughter of Edward Jacob, Esq., of Canterbury, and had an only
daughter and heiress, Mary who married April 14th, 1789, Edward Jeremiah
Curteis, Esq., of Windmill Hill and the Knells, Sussex, M.P. for the County of
Sussex 1820-30. The grandmother of the Rev. Stephen Barrett was the sister of
Doctor Sharp, Archbishop of York, and the surname of his mother was Clough.
Early in life he was an intimate friend of Dr. Johnson and of Mr. Cave, the
original editor of the Gentleman’s
Magazine
, to which he was a frequent contributor. Mr. Barrett was the
author of a translation of the Pastorals of Pope into Latin Hexameters and of
several smaller publications.

“Bent,
his family residence, and the land adjacent was the property of the Barretts
for more than 400 years, before the general adoption of surnames in England.
(In 1379, there were Johannes Baret, Johannes Baret, jonior, and Willelmus de
Bent living at Sutton.)

“His
paternal grandfather was a zealous partisan of King Charles I, after whose
death he was compelled to take refuge in Ireland, a price having been set on
his head. After the restoration he returned to England but he was not able to
recover back more than a small portion of the property which had been wrested
from him during the troubles. The Rev. Stephen Barrett died, aged 83, at
Church House, Northiam, Sussex, the residence of his son-in-law, and was
buried at Hothfield, December 3rd, 1801. His daughter, Mrs Curteis, of
Windmill Hill, died May 14th, 1841, aged 76, and was interred in the family
vault of the Curteis family of Windmill Hill, in Warthing Church, Sussex. She
left a numerous family, of which the eldest son Herbert Barrett Curteis, of
Windmill Hill, was M.P. for Sussex 1830-31, East Sussex 1832-37, Rye
1841-47.”

John
Clough, of the Bent, was born 1752, and died January 18th, 1833, aged 80,
leaving Robert, of Grove Mill, grandfather of the present Messrs. Robert,
William, and John Clough, of Grove Mill, he married Ann Howett, and died
January 8th, 1848, aged 66; William, of the Bent, who died March 9th, 1867,
aged 83; John Clough, of Steeton; and Alice, who married John Speak, of Royd
House, and who died August 31st, 1831.

John
Clough, of Steeton, died a.d.
1872, leaving William Clough, of Whitley House; Thomas, of the Shroggs; John
of the Hobhill; Robert, of Clifton, near Bristol; and Mrs. Simeon Townend, of
Springfield, Great Horton.

A Poll
Tax was laid in the second year of the reign of Richard II, a.d.
1379; from the returns we obtain a list of the inhabitants of the township at
that time and the amount they paid. Then a quarter of wheat sold for 4s., a
gallon of white wine for 6d., and a gallon of red wine for 4d.

The last
fourteen names were the servants of the inhabitants of the place.

Steeton
in the Wapentake of Staincliff.

Thomas
Pearson, husbandman, and wife……………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Thomas
his son, and wife…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
4d.

Lawrence
de Estburn and wife……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Thomas
del Weste and wife……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4d.

William,
the son of Robert, and wife…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
4d.

William
de Stanes and wife…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Richard
de Vtlay and wife…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
4d.

Thomas,
the son of Hugo, and wife……………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

John
de Estburn and wife……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Richard
del Cote and wife…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
4d.

John
Maresschall and wife…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Agnes
the wife of Richard de Kyghlay……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4d.

Johanna,
the widow of John Sysson…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
4d.

John
Harower and wife……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4d.

Robert
de Schyplay and wife………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Thomas,
the son of William, and wife…………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

William
de Bradley and wife……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4d.

Robert
Walker and wife………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Robert
Pape and wife………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4d.

John
Bretland and wife……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4d.

John
Syward and wife…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Alice,
the widow of Hugo Dauyson……………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Matilda
Dauydoghter…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Richard
Ryder, weaver, and wife…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
6d.

John
Hobson………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

John,
the servant of Lawrence de Estburn………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4d.

Matilda,
the daughter of John Syward………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
4d.

Agnes
de Elom……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

William
Ryder……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
4d.

Agnes,
the sister of aforesaid William………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
4d.

Alice
de Morton…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Elena
Baret………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4d.

Agnes,
daughter of John……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
4d.

Elizabeth
Gylledoghter………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
4d.

John,
the son of Thome del West……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4d.

John
Pape…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
4d.

Robert
le Mayre………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4d.

The
Total

12s.
10d.

All the
lesser merchants and artificers who had the use of the land had to pay
according to the amount of the estate, 6s. 8d., 3s. 4d., 2s., 1s., or 6d. Each
married man who was not possessed of any estate, and is above the age of
sixteen years had for himself and wife unless they were mendicants, to pay 4d.
Each single man and woman 4d. The dukes of Lancaster and Brittany had to pay
10 marks, an earl £4, a baron £2, a knight and an esquire who on account of
his estate ought to be a knight £1, and esquire of less estate 6s. 8d., and
an esquire not having possession of lands, rents, castles, in service or in
the army 3s. 4d., apprentices who follow the law £1, attorneys 6s. 8d.,
franklins (freeholders) according to their estate 6s. 8d., 3s. 4d., 1s.,
&c., notaries and attorneys 3s. 4d., &c.

At
Steeton there was only one lesser artificer, a weaver who paid 6d., the rest
were occupiers of land or servants. This poll-tax was the cause of the
insurrection headed by Wat Tyler. In the eastern counties, its levy gathered
crowds of peasants together, armed with clubs, rusty swords, and bows; the
royal commissioners sent to repress the tumult were driven from the field, and
a party of insurgents in Essex gave the signal for open revolt by crossing the
Thames under Jack Straw and calling Kent to arms. To such a tax, the poorest
man of his class contributed as a large a sum as the wealthiest, and the
injustice of such an exaction set England on fire from sea to sea. A French
war had been disastrous, one English fleet had been beaten by the Spaniards,
and a second sunk by storm; and it was to defray the cost of these failures
that Parliament had granted the tax.

The book
containing the minutes of the township business commences a.d.
1777. Then John Lund was Overseer of the Poor and Constable for his farm in
Steeton. The accounts were:-


Dr.

£

s.

d.

To
Cash paid by monthly payments

24

2

6



Weekly

30

0

9



Necessities

27

14



House-rents

13

13

10



Constable

15

16



Churchwarden’s bill for church

3

0

0



Surveyor’s bill

0

7

0

£114

15


Cr.

£

s.

d.

By
20 Assessments at £5 7s. 0½d.

107

0

10


  Surplus of
Land Tax

1

2


  the Sale of
Mercy Smith’s Goods

2

4

11½


  Cash
received of John Roper

1

18

0

112

5

10¼


  Cash
received of John Teal

2

9

£114

15

Balance
due to John Lund £2 9s. 3½d.; £1 17s. 5d. which John Lund paid to John
Asquith, his predecessor, and which ought to have been a separate charge, is
included in the necessities. Examined and allowed, August 4th, 1778, (errors
excepted) by – William Davy, John Asquith, junior, on behalf of Mrs. Hudson,
William Rishworth, Thomas Harrison, John Roper, William Lee, John Teal. Also
paid Thomas Harrison 5s. 3d., what he hath paid to the church as a farmer of
the corn-tithes in Steeton with which the tithe is not chargeable.

A
List of the farms for which the office of Overseer, etc., was served from the
year 1716 to 1811, is in the same book, being copied from an older book:—

1708
John Asquith’s farm by Michael Pighills

1749

John Asquith

1810

Joseph Wilkins, of “Old Star” Inn

1743
John Asquith junior’s farm by John Redman for David Wilkinson

1776
John Asquith junior’s farm by John Asquith, junior

1781-1787
John Asquith hired by the town

1792-1807

1726
Thomas Barker for his own farm

1755

by John Roper

1735
Peter Bawdwen for his own farm

1767

by Samuel Smith for John Dale

1741
Bankbottom farm by John Hudson

1774

James Craven

1780
Bank farm by Thomas Wood

1720
John Denton’s farm for which the office was served by himself

1728
Eden Street house and farm by William Phillips

1758


Len. Smith

1756
Vicar of Featherstone’s farm by John Craven

1729
Mr. Garforth’s house, &c., near the mill

1759

by Martin Pickles

1721
William Holmes for his own Farm

1739

1760

by Samuel Smith

1775

John Asquith, jun., for William Stead

1731
Elm Farm by Jonathan Fell

1761

William Smith

1773

William Greenwood

1732
Hawkcliffe farm by Jeremiah Hustler

1762

John Hodgson

1744
Hollings farm by John Hodgson

1789

David Midgley

1724
Knott Farm by Thomas Parkinson

1745

William Padgett

1766

William Pickles

1725
Joseph Leach for his own farm

1752

by John Bolton

1740
John Lund’s farm by Richard Holmes for Arthur Hustler

1777

John Lund

1742
Red Lion farm by John Redman

1763

John Hodgson for William Stead

1788

Elias Pollard

1791
Law Close farm by William Smith

1738
Metcalfe’s farm near the mill by Thomas Wade

1771


Abraham Sugden

1768
Meadow Field farm by Samuel Smith for Jas. King

1733
Thos. Parkinson for his own farm at Eastburn

1754

John Wilson

1778

John Teal

1746-7
William Padgett hired by the town

1723
Redcar farm by William Davy

1764

John Asquith, senior

1727
Rishworth’s farm at Eastburn by Henry Smith

1748


John Smith

1769


John Roper for John Smith

1808


William Rishworth

1809


done voluntarily by Wm. Rishworth

1719
Sowden’s farm by John Walsh

1779

James Yates

1736
Robert Smith for his farm at Eastburn

1757

by Samuel Smith

1730
Benjamin Smith for his farm at Eastburn

1751

by Samuel Smith

1772

1763
Henry Stirk’s farm by John Harrison

1716
Whitley Head farm by William Davy

1734

1765

John Asquith, junior

1717
John Walker’s farm by Henry Smith

1737

John Walker

1770

John Roper for John Walker

1722
Stephen Wade’s farm by Henry Smith

1750

Thomas Wade

1811

George Holmes

The
River Aire had its course altered in some places and banked in the years
1862-3-4, in order to lessen the flooding of the low lands.

An Act
of Parliament was obtained for that purpose called the Airedale Drainage Act,
1861, the Royal Assent being given on the 22nd of July of that year. Its
operations comprised parts of the river in the parishes or townships of
Bingley, Keighley, Kildwick, Carleton, Skipton, Broughton, Thornton-in-Craven,
Morton, Thwaites, Sutton, Glusburn, Stirton, Thorlby, &c. About £14,000
was spent on different contracts, and £3923 3s. 7d. in getting the Act of
Parliament, and a considerable sum in buying land, compensation, &c.

The
commissioners had not to have more than £25,000 borrowed at the same time on
the security of the rates. The money borrowed, principal and interest, has to
be paid off on 22nd of July, 1891, thirty years after the passing of the Act.

The
commissioners had to rate all the lands within the limit of the Act as shall
be just and reasonable, according and in proportion to the benefit to accrue
to the same lands respectively by reason of the execution of the Act. It is
considered that the lands about Kildwick Bridge were very much benefited;
during the winter months those lands were almost continually flooded, and in
frosty weather were a great resort for skaters.

And now
the end of the first part of this short history has been reached. A
considerable part of the contents of this work is obtained from the writings
of the late Mr. Jonathan Hindle which have been kindly lent to me; a part of
it is told in his own words. Mr. Hindle was born in 1786, and died January
4th, 1866, and it is to his zeal in antiquarian research that many of these
facts are not lost to posterity.

There is
nothing very sensational in the history of Steeton; there are no records of
any great battle being won or lost here; no feudal lord ever built a castle
here. The history of Steeton is simply a plain dry record of property going
out of one family into another, of houses being built, of new roads being
made, — events which are taking place in every township at the present time;
and it is a plain enumeration of these events that it is hoped will be found
in this narrative.

 

Part
Second.

œ0

Considerable
information having been obtained since the first part was written, which
substantiates and corrects many different items that it contains, it is
thought better to make the second part a sort of criticism on the preceding,
in order that this little work may be more complete.


1Page 2, line 35. — The following is taken from Parliamentary Writs. Vol. I,
in British Museum:– “In 1314, John de Styveton, Robert de Styveton, and
Thomas de Styveton, were summoned to muster at Newcastle-on-Tyne to perform
military service against the Scots.” (Probably in the campaign which ended
so disastrously at Bannockburn). “In 1316 John de Styveton was certified as
lord of the township of Steeton in Yorkshire, and Robert de Styveton as lord
of the township of Marr in the same county.” (They evidently survived
Bannockburn.) “In 1318, John de Styveton was a commissioner of array for the
Wapentake of Staincliffe, and in 1319 Robert de Styveton held the same
office.”

In
Hunter’s Rotuli Selecti, p. 250, British Museum, is an account of the lands
of the rebels given to those who were faithful in the time of Henry III.
“All the lands of Thomas of Metteham in the county of York, and all the
lands and tenements in Stokin and Lanin which belonged to Nicholas Eyvill,
Thomas of Drayton, and Henry de Briton, in value £11, were given to Robert de
Styveton.”

39 Henry
III. Inquest on the lands of Ric. De Styveton.

2
Page 2, line 41. — According to a book published by the Surtees Society, the
arms of Sir William Plumpton, a knight of the province of York, who was with
Edward I in Scotland and elsewhere, was:- azure
three fusils in fesse or,
each charged with an escallop
gules.

3
Page 3, line 4. — Sir Robert Plumpton, of Plumpton co. Ebor, Kt., married
the daughter of Sir Godfrey Foljambe, of Hassop, co. Derby; he died on the
Feast of Conception of our Lady 8th December, 9 Henry V (1421) and was buried
in the Plumpton Choir, in Spofforth Church; she was born 1387, married 1392-3,
and died previous to 1416.

4
Page 3, line 7. — How the manor of Steeton first came into the hands of the
Plumptons is not made out, but that family were the owners of Steeton a.d.
1416. On the 20th January, 1416, Sir Robert Plumpton, Knight, of Plumpton,
near Knaresborough, in a contract of marriage between his son William and
Elizabeth, the daughter of Sir Bryan Stapilton engages to convey the manor of
Steeton to trustees to secure to them a rent charge of 40 marks a year in case
they were legally ousted of an estate in Kynalton also settled on them. On the
24th September, 1420, the same Sir Robert enfeoffed his mother and other
trustees, amongst other estates, with the manors of Plumpton, Idill, Steton-in-Aierdale,
Nesfield near Addingham, and Grassington in Craven.

5
Page 3, line 8. — Robert Plumpton was married a.d.
1446, to Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas, Lord Clifford, of Skipton Castle, when
he was only sixteen years of age and his bride six, as was the custom in those
days. Hardly had three years passed however when he died; three years later a.d.
1453, his bride at the age of twelve was again married to his brother William.

6
Page 3, line 10. — Margaret was born 1459, and Elizabeth 1460-1.

7
Page 3, line 30. — The second marriage of Sir William Plumpton was a private
one, after hearing evidence the ecclesiastical court at York sanctioned it.
The name of the second wife was Catherine, daughter of Thomas Everingham
according to manuscripts in the British Museum, and her name is also otherwise
given as Joan, daughter of Thomas Winteringham, of Winteringham Hall, near
Knaresborough, and that she was married a.d.
1451, and died a.d. 1497.

8
Page 3, line 34. — Also in a.d.
1475, Sir William caused feoffments to be made of all his property to
trustees, amongst which were the manors of Grassington and Steeton in
Yorkshire, and Kynalton in Nottinghamshire, to be held to the use of Sir
William Plumpton and his wife for their lives, with remainder to his son
Robert in tail. Proceedings were soon taken by his daughters and their
husbands to assert their title to some of their grandfather’s estate, and in
1480 the contending parties became bound to abide by the award of arbitrators.
Before the award was given Sir William Plumpton died and his son Robert
succeeded to the property.

9
Page 4, line 43. — The award of Richard III 16th September, 1483, was that
the two daughters should have a sufficient and lawful estate in tail in the
manors of Steton and Garsington in Yorkshire, and in various manors in
Derbyshire, and that the Plumpton’s should have the residue of Sir William
Plumpton’s estates. In spite of this award, Sir Richard Empson, the
well-known tool of Henry VII brought an action against Sir Robert Plumpton in
the interests of the two daughters for the residue of the estate, and
succeeded in getting a verdict in their favour. His intervention could hardly
have had no interested motive since he about the same time married his
daughter Joan to Henry Sotehill, and moreover had one of the manors obtained
from the Plumptons granted to himself.

10
Page 5, line 14. — Sir Robert had been almost ruined by the law expenses,
and had only escaped personal arrest by being made a Knight of the Body by
Henry VII. This immunity ceased on the succession of his son Henry VIII and
soon after he was so reduced by the costs of the suit that he was arrested for
debt. His enemy, Sir Richard Empson, met with a worse fate, for he was
beheaded on Tower Hill in answer to the clamour of his numerous victims. These
circumstances probably opened a way to a compromise, for in 1514 all parties
agreed to abide the decision of arbitrators, this was given in the same year,
and by it, Sir Robert was restored to the manor of Plumpton, and all lands and
messuages within the parish of Spofforth, whilst Sir John Roucliff and his
wife, and the Sotehills were confirmed in the residue of the estates in
dispute.

11
Page 5, line 18. — Sir Robert in 1482 served with the Earl of Northumberland
in the Scottish wars, and was knighted by Richard, Duke of Gloucester, in
Hooton Field near Berwick. He attended the coronation of Elizabeth, queen of
Henry VII in 1487. In 1489, he was actively engaged in suppressing the
insurrection of the commons which began with the massacre of Earl of
Northumberland at Topcliffe, and was finally subdued at the battle of Ackworth.
For his services he received a letter of thanks from Henry VII. The law suits
came with disastrous weight upon Sir Robert, the warrior knight who had
received the thanks of the king afterwards became for a time a prisoner in
jail for debt.

He died
1523, and was buried at Spofforth. The following were the owners of Plumpton
in succession:— William, died 11th July, 1547, aged 62; Robert, born 1515,
died aged 31 in 1546 during his father’s lifetime; William, who succeeded to
the estates of his grandfather, and who married firstly, Mary, daughter of Sir
William Vavasour of Haslewood, and secondly, Anne, daughter of Edward Griffin
of Dingley by whom he had Edward who succeeded him and a large family besides.
William Plumpton who was born 1543, died January 1601-2, and was buried in
Spofforth church, had by his first wife a son Robert who died unmarried before
his father. In 1567, a marriage was contracted between Ellen, the daughter of
Sir Ingram Clifford and Robert, son and heir of William Plumpton of Plumpton,
both being infants; and it was agreed that Sir Ingram Clifford and his wife
Anne (who were the owners of half the manor and township of Steeton) should
settle certain lands, amongst which were Steeton, Idle, Nesfield, Studley,
Eastburn and Glusburn, to trustees to hold to them for life with remainder to
the married couple and their issue. It would have been strange coincidence if
the family who struggled hard to deprive the Plumptons of all their estates
some half century before, should have restored the same estates to the same
family by marriage. Fate willed otherwise, both infants died, and the estates
were finally bequeathed by Sir Ingram Clifford as the heir of his wife to his
nephew the Earl of Northumberland. The Plumptons remained attached to the
Roman Catholic Faith after the Reformation.

The
family of Plumpton continued at Plumpton (which is about four miles from
Harrogate) for some two centuries longer, Robert who was the last heir male of
the line of Plumpton, was born April 23rd, 1721, and died August 8th, 1749.
After the death of the last heir, the Plumpton estate, then reckoned worth £700
a year, was sold by Mrs. Anne Plumpton and her co-parceners, to Daniel
Lascelles, Esq., for £28,000. Since that time it has continued in the family
of Lascelles, and is now the property of the Earl of Harewood. Of the dwelling
of the Plumptons little is known, not a vestige remains; not one stone remains
upon another of the embattled mansion erected by Sir William Plumpton during
the reign of Edward IV. Leland, the Antiquary, who saw it when complete,
styles it “a faire house, with two toures, longging to the same.” When the
estate was purchased by Daniel Lascelles in 1760, he pulled down the old
mansion with the intention of building a new one, which he actually commenced
and carried up several stories, but purchasing Goldsborough estate he took up
his residence there, and the unfinished building at Plumpton was taken down to
the ground. From about the year a.d. 1168,
when Nigellus de Pluntona was the owner, until a.d.
1760, the estate of Plumpton was held possession of by his descendants.
Plumpton is now remarkable for its beautiful pleasure grounds. They were laid
out by Daniel Lascelles, Esq., who, by taking advantage of a small stream of
water, and a piece of rocky rugged ground, made the grounds almost unique for
their beauty and variety. The grounds comprise about twenty-three acres. The
huge grey rocks are diversified with shrubs, flowers, and evergreens; and at
the foot of the rocks is a lake covering about seven acres, which adds greatly
to the beauty of the scenery.

12
Page 5, line 27. — Anthony Garforth was the principal farmer at Steeton a.d.
1562; he then took half of his land on lease of 80 years from Sir Ingram
Clifford, Kt., and Dame Ann his wife, and the other half for a term of 21
years from Anthony Thorold, Esq., and Ann his wife, and William Bevercoates,
gentleman, and Cecilia his wife. The holding of Anthony Garforth consisted
of:— Manor House commonly called Steeton Hall, two barns, one kilne, one
house wherein Dyonisius Garforth his brother dwelleth and two gardens, one
orchard and two crofts adjoining containing 8½ acres, one close of meadow
called New Ings 15 acres, one close of arable and meadow called Broadholmes 26
acres, Tranker 4¼ acres, three closes called Royds 4¾ acres, Helm-royd 4¼
acres, Madok field 6 acres, Long Ridding 1 acre, two closes of pasture called
the Flatts 22 acres, Frank Syke and Flat-end 1 acre, Bristal 6 acres, two
Braceletts 8 acres, Wheatholme 3½ acres, Flitholme 3¾ acres, Thornflatt 2¼
acres, one close of very barren pasture and woody ground full of rocks and
stones called Hawkcliffe 30 acres, Sutteronings Ings 1 acre, three Wheat Lees
barren and craggy ground 24 acres, Law close and two Hopkin crofts barren
ground 23¼ acres, one close near the hall called Calf close 1 acre, and land
and meadow lying in divers places in common town fields 11 acres, and 2 kyne-gates
in a common pasture called Barrows estimated at 2 acres, with sufficient
common belonging to the same. (The unenclosed land consisted a.d.
1797, of 960 acres). The rent was £12 and had to be paid in equal proportions
at the Feast of St. John the Baptist and St. Andrew the Apostle, and the whole
contained 208½ acres.

The said
Anthony Garforth also held one water corn mill, standing in Steeton on the
brook there called Steeton Beck, and all watercourses, dams, etc., belonging
to the same at a yearly rent of 24s.; he also held a cottage adjoining Wheat
Lees and a little garth adjoining, rent 4d.; and an improvement adjoining upon
Hawkcliffe containing 2 acres, and rent 2s. Total rent for demayne lands, £13
6s. 4d.

John
Garforth held at the same time, one messuage, one barn, &c., two gardens,
a little croft adjoining divided into two parts, and four oxgangs of land
meadow and pasture belonging to the same, viz:— two closes of arable land
called Hall-steads 4½ acres, Kelk 6 acres, Blind Pool 2¼ acres,
Laverack-holme 1¾ acres, Scaleholme 4 acres, Maw-ridding 4¼ acres, Pott 1½
acres, Wythes 1¼ acres, Townend close 1¾ acres, and one way of sufferance
adjoining the same 1 rood, one close of very barren pasture, woody and craggy
ground called Law close 30 acres, Ridding 4 acres, two Pudding-sykes 2½ acres,
Bowdens 1 acre, 7 acres on the common fields of arable land, 1 acre on a
common field of meadow land; one house, barn, &c., wherein on John Hobson
then dwelt, and one garth adjoining, 1 rood, with other buildings, parcels of
land that usually go with the same, viz:— Barstow-heads 1¼ acres,
Laverack-holme, 3¼ acres in common meadows, 2½ kyne-gates in Barrows a
pasture estimated at 3 acres, right of common, &c. This holding consists
of about 80¾ acres, at a rental of £2 12s. 4d.

Richard
Hustler held at the same time one messuage, one barn, &c., one yard, one
orchard, a croft adjoining 3 roods, two closes called Carr-royds 1¾ acres,
Bowdens 2 roods, Stonegroves, Fulesyke a meadow 2 roods, 5¼ acres in common
field pasture, 1 kyne-gate in Barrows a pasture 1¼ acres, with common
rights of pasture, &c. About 10 acres, at a rent of 9s. 9d.

William
Davy held:— one messuage, one barn, &c., with one garth and a croft
adjoining, containing 3 roods, Heads arable 1 acre, at Pudding-syke ½ rood,
Bowdens a pasture with a parcel of land being at the end thereof in the way ½
rood, 3½ acres in town fields arable, 1½ acres meadow, and one beast-gate on
the Barrows 1¼ acres, common of pasture, &c. The whole containing more
than 4¼ acres, at a rent of 8s. 4d.

William
Garforth held at the will of the lord:— one messuage, one barn, late in the
tenure of John Mason whose daughter the said William Garforth had married,
three garths, one little croft ½ rood, Summerhill a meadow 1¼ acres,
Stonebrigg arable ½ rood, Tranker 2¼ acres, Pighills arable 1¼ acres, Pott
arable 2 roods, 1¼ acres of arable land and ½ rood of meadow land in the
common fields, common of pasture, &c. About 6f
acres, at a rent of 9s. 4d.

William
Whitaker held:— one messuage, one barn and other buildings, one house which
is supposed to have been the court house in times past, one garth and a croft
adjoining 1 acre, and two oxgangs of land, meadow and pasture belonging to the
same, contained in the several parcels following:— New close arable 2¼
acres, the Croft 1½ acres, Thorn-flat 3¼ roods, Gillgarth adjoining 1 acre,
Grimthwaite containing (besides land belonging to William, Judith and Richard
Hustler aforesaid,) 1 acre, 5 acres of arable land in the common town field, 2½
acres of meadow in the same, two kyne-gates in pasture called Barrows 2 acres,
(the Barrows in all contained 9½ Kyne-gates, 2 Stirk-gates, 5 Beast-gates,
and its size was 21¼ acres,) common rights, &c. About 17¼ acres, at a
rent of 17s. 9d.

Anthony
Fox and Elizabeth Hartley, widow, held:— one messuage, two barns, &c.,
one garden, and a third part of two oxgangs of land meadow and pasture, viz:—
Bent close arable and Far Bent close divided into several parts containing 6¼
acres, Wythesend meadow 1 acre, one parcel of arable land in town field called
Drakessyke 3 acres, and one parcel of meadow in Yowmyers and West Ings 3
roods, common of pasture, &c. About 11 acres, at a rent of 5s.

There is
an account of all the holdings of the tenant a.d.
1583, but it is unnecessary to print the whole, the most interesting have been
selected. On page 8 is a list of all of them and the amount of rent that they
paid.

13
Page 5, line 36. — Sir Ingram Clifford who married a.d.
1567, Anne, daughter and heiress of Sir John Rocliffe, died a.d.
1584.

14
Page 5, line 39, and page 6 lines 14 and 16. — From about a.d.
1500 to a.d. 1600, Steeton
belonged to several owners, every field and every house belonged to different
people in certain proportions; thus a.d.
1562 each farmer paid half their rent to Sir Ingram Clifford, a quarter to
Anthony Thorold, and a quarter to William Bevercoates. This being the case, at
the commencement of the seventeenth century when several of the tenants
purchased their holdings, and when the heirs-general of the Plumptons sold
their different proportions, the ownership of property must have been
complicated for some considerable time.

On the
19th June, 1600, William Oglethrope and Elizabeth his wife, of Roundhay, sold
to William Garforth (the name was written Gartheforthe then,) one-fourth part
of manor or lordship of Steeton-with-Eastburn for £460 10s.

William
Oglethrope of Roundhay, evidently sold his Steeton interest at different
times; in addition to selling to William Garforth a.d.
1600, and to Richard Whitaker, a.d.
1599, he sold property to William Laycock of Silsden. William Laycock also
made a purchase of John Hargreaves, and a close Thornholm from Dionis Davy.

William
Laycock, yeoman, of Silsden, being lawfully seized of three parts of certain
property at Steeton by an indenture dated 5th October, 1612, gives it to
trustees, Hugh Currer of Kildwick, and William Jowett of Silsden, schoolond,
in trust, subject to certain charges, for his nephew, William Jennings of
Silsden, with remainder to others of the family of Jennings.

On the
6th October, 1604, George, Earl of Cumberland, Francis Clifford, Esq., and Sir
Wm. Ingilby, Knt., sold to William Garforth a half part of capital messuage or
tenement called Steeton Hall, and a half part of the demesne lands, then in
the occupation of William Garforth, and a half part of the water cornmill.
(This purchase would probably be a half-part of about 212 acres; the site of
the hall would be either the same or near where the present house is
situated.)

William
Slater of Halifax, gentleman, and John Midgley, of Headley, in Bradford Dale,
yeoman, bought half of the manor of Steeton and Glusburn, and a part of
certain lands, of Right Hon. George late Earl of Cumberland, Francis, the now
Earl of Cumberland, (1607) and Sir Wm. Ingilby, of Ripley, 5th October, 1604.
John Midgley sold his share to Wm. Slater soon afterwards, and William Slater
sold unto different people his half part of several messuages, lands, etc.
William Garforth bought 21st, Dec., 1607, from William Slater, half of the
manor of Steeton and Glusburn, and the half part of the property still
belonging to William Slater. On the 25th April, 1612, Sir Gervase Clifton sold
to William Garforth, Hugh Currer of Kildwick, John Holmes of Steeton, and
Richard Hudson, of Glusburn, his fourth part of certain property at Steeton.
At this time, a.d. 1612, the
Currers would make their first purchase of property, at Steeton.

Sir
Gervase Clifton, baronet and knight, of Clifton, co. Nottingham, sold to
Edward Malham of Over Bradley, John Midgley of Headley in Bradford Dale, and
Peter Jennings of Silsden, gentleman, one-fourth part of manor of Steeton with
Eastburn, and one-fourth part of all messuages, crofts, &c., in any wise
belonging to the manor, which were heretofore the inheritance of lady Anne
Thorold, widow of Sir Anthony Thorold of Marston, and now the inheritance of
Sir Gervase Clifton, situate at Steeton, Eastburn, Glusburn, Silsden,
Kildwick, &c., 11th June, 1612.

An
indenture dated 6th November, 1612, states that Edward Malham, John Midgley,
and Peter Jennings purchased the preceding on trust at the request of William
Garforth and others, tenants in Steeton, Eastburn, and Glusburn, to convey to
said tenants such parts as they did agree to purchase, and for which everyone
of them paid their rateable part. William Garforth got the manor-house, water
corn-mill, &c., then in his occupation.

15
Page 7, line 39. — Royd House is now the property of Major Whalley of
Lancaster. In the year 1778 it belonged to Miss Foulds; for a considerable
time it was the property of the Coates, and before them of the Maymonds. Over
the front entrance to the lane is:— WM
AM; over a door in the farm building is:— RC
1878  MC; and is on the casing spouts.

Roger
Coates of Royd House died a.d.
1725, leaving two daughters, Sarah and Mary. He was owner of Royd House and
had property at Knowthorp in the parish of Leeds, at Barston Biggin in the
parish of Sherburn, at Kildwick Grange which he left to his father for life
and was in the father’s possession; at Addingham, Eastburn, Sutton, Gisburn,
at Windhill, in Netherdale near Greenhow Hill, and Long Preston, which were
purchased by him. He married Sarah Beaumont. His brother, John Coates, a
foreign merchant in London, died 1721, and left his property which he
inherited from his uncle John Coates of Kildwick, to his brother Roger Coates
of Royd House. Roger Coates of Kildwick Grange, their father, died 1728,
leaving two daughters, Rosamond Swire, widow of Roger Swire of Cononley, and
Elizabeth who had married Christopher Hartley of Marton, and two
grand-daughters, daughters of his son Roger Coates of Royd House. The family
of Speak who live there now have occupied Royd House since the time of Edmund
Garforth, who died a.d. 1771.

16
Page 10, line 4. — Anthony had a second son Edmund, who gave a receipt for a
legacy of £200 from his father to his brother William, 32 Elizabeth, (1589.)

17
Page 10, line 17. — The Garforths were continually buying and selling
different properties in Steeton; from a.d.
1786 to a.d. 1810 their estate
in the township would be twice as large as it had generally been before that
time.

18
Page 10, line 18. — The Act of Parliament for allotting, dividing, and
enclosing the several moors, commons, and waste grounds within the manor or
manors and township or townships of Steeton with Eastburn, was obtained 27
Geo. III a.d. 1787. J.B.
Garforth was Lord of the manor, and the said unenclosed grounds consisted of
966 acres.

The
commissioners appointed were:— Joshua Hirst of Brockwell Green, co. Surrey,
representing the lord of the manor, John Sharp, Gildersome, and John Asquith,
Steeton, representing the other proprietors. One-twelfth part had to be given
to the lord of the manor; not exceeding 20 acres had to be set aside for
getting sand, gravel, and stones, to erect buildings on the said moors, for
repairing the highway to Keighley and for making new public highways. The road
over the moor had become the property of Joseph Edwards, gentleman. This road
had to be taken possession of and such recompense to be given out of the said
commons as was in the judgement of the commissioners its equivalent. The
remainder had to be divided amongst all who were entitled to right of common,
in proportion, quantity and quality considered, to the real value of their
estates.

19
Page 11, line 1. — William Garthforth
died a.d. 1627. Besides his
eldest son, William, he had five others, Anthony, Dionis, Arthur, and Thomas
and Matthew. His property was settled 16 James I, 1618, when it was settled
upon the eldest son, charged with the payment of £500 to the younger
children, to be paid in yearly payments of £100 after the decease of the
father, in or at the porch annexed to
the south side of Kildwick Church
. Lawrence Rawson, of Shipley, and John
Hartley were trustees under the settlement. The three eldest sons got £34
each in their father’s lifetime, which being taken into account, the five
younger sons inherited about £114 each. This will is signed 27th October,
1624, and it stipulates that he is to be buried in
the parish church of Kildwick.

Rosamund
Garforth, widow, was manager of the estate a.d.
1631.

20
Page 11, line 4. — Edmund Garforth of Gargrave, clerk, bought of William
Garforth, the elder, of Steeton, gentleman, and William Garforth, the
grandson, 6th March, 1665, for £126:— Upper and lower Braclets, 12 acres.
The same closes were bought of Christopher Hartley of Barrowford, 9th May,
1664, for £112.

21
Page 11, line 21. — William, son of Anthony and grandson of William Garforth,
(all living 1668), married Isabel, daughter of John Rishworth of Gilgrange,
Silsden, 1668. The marriage settlement is dated 18th August, 1668. William
Garforth bought 30th September, 1669, Lower Tranker containing 5 acres, of
James Lund of Steeton.

Richard
Dixon of Sutton, gentleman, and Isabel his wife, eldest daughter of William
Garforth of Steeton, received £600 (£400 in money and the equivalent of £200
in lease of some land) from Edmund Garforth, 1699, the manor, &c., of
Steeton, being charged with the payment of it by indenture of William Garforth
the elder, August 10th, 1668.

The
Dixons were a family who lived at Sutton House until about 60 years ago. About
1825 Robert Clough of Ingrow bought it, but sold it soon after to the Heatons
from whom it has come to the Sutcliffes.

22
Page 11, line 22. — Edmund Garforth bought May 31st, 1709, of John Smith of
Hill-end, for £4 7s., a piece of land called Lower Garth containing 11
roods.

The
boundary of the township was frequently perambulated at that time. The
boundary of the manor was ridden 6th May, 1718, by Isaac Grandorge, steward,
Hugh Currer, William Parkinson, Henry Currer, John Ponton, and Michael Pighles.
Then Mrs. Elizabeth Garforth, widow of Edmund Garforth, was the guardian of
her son Edmund Garforth, the lord of the manor. The boundaries of manors of
Steeton and Glusburn belonging to Thomas Garforth were ridden 3rd June, 1728.
The name of this Thomas Garforth occurs in the will of John Drake of Keighley,
dated 27th March, 1713, by which he received £20. Mr. Drake died May 23rd,
1713, leaving property for the maintenance of a schoolmaster at Keighley.

23
Page 11, line 24. — On December 20th, 1721, Edmund, who was born 1700, and
died 1722, being 21 years of age, gives his estate to trustees, (John Topham
of Kildwick, clerk, John Swainson of Skipton, John Grandorge of Hothfield,
Kent, Doctor in Divinity, his mother’s brother, and Thomas Grandorge of the
city of London,) to give £40 a year to his mother, Elizabeth Garforth, for
life, and £400 each to his brother and two sisters, Thomas, Elizabeth, and
Olivia. The property was situate at Steeton, Eastburn, Cowling-head, Glusburn,
in the parish of Gargrave, one water corn-mill, and one-third of the tithes of
the rectory of Gargrave.

Thomas
succeeded his brother Edmund in the ownership of the property a.d.
1722, Elizabeth married Ralph Baynes, and Olivia married John Bradley of
Carhead.

John
Bradley, born a.d. 1708, was
the son of John Bradley of Cononley and Carhead, by Mary his wife, daughter of
John Green, merchant, of St. Saviour’s, Southwark, whom he married a.d.
1705. His father, John Bradley, was the son of Thomas Bradley, who married a.d.
1680, Mary, daughter of Edmund Laycock. Edmund Laycock married Mary, only
daughter of Henry Pighills of Laverock Hall, Oakworth, by Mary his wife,
daughter of George Clapham of Exley Head. Thomas Pighills of Royd House,
parish of Keighley, purchased Laverock Hall a.d.
1585, of Thomas Lockwood of Linthwaite. Henry Pighills rebuilt Laverock Hall a.d.
1640, and left four sons and a daughter:— Henry; Thomas, of Longcroft and
Bowshaw Well in Ickornshaw, who bought Carhead House, of Stephen, son of
Stephen and Thomasine Laycock; Nathan, who outlived all his brothers and
inherited their property; and Francis. Nathan Pighills bought a part of Carr
Green from William Wainman, who by his marriage with his cousin, Mary,
daughter of Edmund Laycock, had obtained a part of Colling Carr, and the manor
of Cowling; died a.d. 1711, and
left his estate to his great nephew, John Bradley. His son, John Bradley,
married Olive, daughter of Edmund Garforth of Steeton Hall, but died 15th
November 1751, without issue; and his daughter Elizabeth, sole heiress of her
brother, married a.d. May 4th,
1740, Richard Wainman of Bolling, near Bradford, grandson of the
aforementioned William Wainman, and son of William Wainman of Bolling, who
married a.d. 1702, Hannah,
daughter of William Rawson of Bolling Hall. The last mentioned William Wainman
sold Old Carhead (formerly called Colling Carr) to Edmund Laycock of
Horncastle, co. Lincoln. By the marriage of Richard Wainman with Elizabeth
Bradley he became possessed of the Carhead estate, and his son, William
Wainman, re-purchased the remainder in 1788, of Dr Edmund Laycock of the
Close, Lincoln. Stephen Laycock purchased a.d. 1616,
Carhead (formerly called Carr Green) of Alvary Copley; Hugh Laycock was the
owner of Colling Carr (now called Old Carhead) in 1611, and Edmund Laycock
bought the manor of Colling from Alvary Copley a.d.
1630.

The
following were the Wainman family in succession:— Richard Wainman, died 21st
February, 1790, aged 85; William Wainman, died April 5th, 1818, aged 78;
Richard Bradley Wainman, died 1842, aged 59; William Bradley Wainman, died
February 17th, 1872, aged 59.

Mrs.
Olive Bradley, then a widow, lived at Steeton a.d.
1752, but died at York a.d.
1754, leaving all she had equally between her nephews, William Baynes and John
Baynes Garforth.

24
Page 11, line 25. — In the first part at this place there is an error, the
same mistake occurs in the pedigree of the Garforths in Whitaker’s History
of Craven, the name is Edmund, not Edward, he died 1722, and it was his
brother Thomas who died a.d.
1743, who willed the property to John Baynes.

Thomas
Barber of Steeton, sold Thomas Garforth, 11th March 1731, for £60, two closes
Upper and Lower Barrowes estimated at five days work.

Mr.
Thomas Garforth who died a.d.
1743, by his will dated 4th July, 1738, left to his nephew William Baynes £300,
and all his tenths of grain, corn, &c., and appurtenances whatsoever
within the township of Ashton with Stodday, in co. Lancaster, being part of
the parsonage or rectory of Lancaster; and he left his Steeton property and
one-third part of his tithes of the rectory of Gargrave (the third part of the
tithes was worth £24 a year, a.d.
1743; the Gargrave property was not large, being worth £2 12s. 6d.
a year, and farmed by a Matthew Garforth,) on trust (see page 21) till his
nephew, John Baynes, second son of his sister, Elizabeth Baynes, should become
twenty-one, he and his male issue having to take the name of Garforth. If John
Baynes did not take the name of Garforth, the property had to go to his elder
brother, William Baynes, on the same conditions. If William Baynes did not
take the name the property had to got to his right heirs for ever.

There
was a branch of the family of Garforth which lived at Cowling for some time.
Of this family there were Ann who died about 1768, William of Gamsgill, who
was living at Steeton 28th May, 1762, and Edmund, who was living at Royd House
a.d. 1769, and died a.d.
1771, aged 63. The names of their father and mother were Edmund and Maria.
Edmund Garforth of Gamsgill, yeoman, their father, died 1721. William Garforth
of Gamsgill, left his property to his brother and sister for life and then to
John Baynes Garforth and John Baynes, son of William Baynes. This is how
Surgill farm and Gamsgill farm (Warley Wise farm is at Cowling, but it was J.B.
Garforth’s property a.d.
1750,) came into the possession of the Steeton family, (see page 17). (The
godson of this William Garforth, Joshua Newby, clerk, was living a.d.
1762, but he was not vicar of Kildwick). Edmund Garforth of Royd House, left
some property at Colne to Peter Garforth, miller, of Skipton, who is the
ancestor of the Garforths of Coniston Cold, now represented by Mrs. Tottie.

Glusburn
Moor which consisted of 700 acres in Glusburn township, was enclosed and
divided a.d. 1778. At that
time, William Bawdwen was the owner of Stonegappe, and Miss Foulds of Royd
House. Thomas Whyman of Barton Lodge, co. Lancaster, George Jackson of
Richmond, and John Asquith the younger, of Steeton, were appointed
commissioners, to make the division. J.B. Garforth was the lord of the manor,
for which he was given one-twelfth part of the common as compensation for his
consent, right, and interest. He was still the owner of the minerals and
metals, and had the right to go down for them anywhere except where there were
buildings, yards, or gardens.

John
Baynes Garforth purchased from Mrs. Ann Hudson, March 3rd, 1780, for £600 the
following:— Horse pastures and Wire six days’ work, Great Grimes croft
four days’ work, Little Grimes croft one days’ work, Boodence three
days’ work, second Boodens one days’ work, messuage adjoining the same,
&c., quarter day’s work, another Boodens two days’ work, in the
occupation of John Asquith the younger; and two dwelling-houses. In all
seventeen and a quarter days’ work.

He also
purchased from his nephew, John Baynes of Skipton, 13th September, 1786, a
dwelling-house at Steeton, in occupation of William Barker, for £10; and he
obtained Kelk 3 acres, 2 roods, and Lairlands 1 acre, 1786, in exchange from
William Rishworth.

At this
time there was land in Steeton belonging to the vicarage of Featherstone, near
Pontefract, upwards of 30 miles from Steeton, how it was got I have not made
out, but 6th August, 1789, John Baynes Garforth gives 23 acres, 2 roods in the
township of Ackton in the parish of Featherstone, to the vicarage of
Featherstone in exchange for the lands at Steeton, measuring 13 acres. The
lands at Steeton consisted of:— Parkes, Salter Ing or Low Ing, Trankers,
Wise close, a small piece called Foulsike, and two cottages with the garths
belonging, valued at about £21 per annum.

The Rev.
Christopher Driffield, vicar of Featherstone, died before the completion of
the exchange, and his successor, Rev. George De Smeth Kelly completed it. The
property at Ackton was purchased 1st April, 1788, for £658 of John Perfect,
Esq., of Pontefract. The vicarage of Featherstone is now valued at £271 per
annum, and it is in the patronage of Christ Church, Oxford.

John
Baynes Garforth of Steeton, bought of his son Thomas Garforth of Steeton Hall,
for £226, May 15th, 1789:— dwelling-house, barn, outbuildings,
&c., and mill, croft adjoining in occupation of ———— Longbottom;
another dwelling-house with barn, &c., in occupation of Brian Dale; Tenter
croft, bounded on the east by brook called Steeton Beck, on the west by
highway leading northwards from turnpike road to the dwelling-house of John
Baynes Garforth, and on the south by the turnpike road; and a dwelling-house,
four parcels of land, gardens, &c., all situated towards the north-west
end of Tenter croft.

To make
a calculation, it is probable that the estate of John Baynes Garforth in the
township of Steeton with Eastburn, consisted a.d.
1780, of 290 or 300 acres.

25
Page 11, line 37. — It is very probable that John Baynes Garforth did not
live much at Steeton though he evidently had a residence here; where he spent
most of his time was London. Previous to 1786 his residence at Steeton was the
Low Hall, (John Asquith the younger lived at the Upper Hall, 1786,) in 1789 it
was the Upper Hall, his son living then at the Hall; and Mrs. Garforth, his
wife, lived at the Upper Hall, 7th January, 1801. He is described November
23rd, 1757, as being of the Middle Temple, London, from which we come to the
conclusion that he was a barrister; a.d.
1762 he was living in London. In the year 1769 he was living in John Street,
near Oxford Market, in the parish of Marylebone; in 1780, 1788, and 1801, he
lived in Lower Brook Street, parish of St. George, Hanover Square. He is
described May 30th, 1801, as late of Steeton, consequently he would most
probably have just ceased having a residence at Steeton. J.B. Garforth died
15th October, 1808, then living in Bryanstone Street, Portman Square. His age
would not be less than 79, perhaps more; he was the owner of the Garforth
estate for 65 years. He left a son and a daughter, Thomas and Elizabeth
Catherine; Thomas inherited his Steeton estate, (see page 21); the daughter
inherited absolutely some tithes, lands, &c., within the hamlet of Hook,
near Kingston-on-Thames, Surrey, and some leasehold property in the county of
Middlesex. His daughter Olivia died before him. One of the trustees, William
Wainman, did not act after a.d.
1813.

William
Baynes, his elder brother, died between 1757 and 1762; in 1757 he was living
at Skipton; he left one son, John Baynes, (see page 21). He married
———— Swainson.

26
Page 11, line 37. — Mr Thomas Garforth was married June 2nd, 1785; his wife
died at Carlisle 17th April, 1838.

27
Page 12. — The purchase of land on page 12 took place 12th April, 1786, the
purchase money was £6500, not £7500; and as this sale is of considerable
interest another account of it with additional particulars is here given. The
names and the dimensions of each field are of interest, the same name is often
used for different fields in the township, which is the cause of perplexity,
and probably the same field often loses its old name and is known by the name
of another at another period of time. Nearly all of them may be traced on a
modern plan of the township of Steeton with Eastburn.

Sale
April 12th, 1786.

Description.

A.

R.

P.

The
messuage or mansion-house (Upper Hall) then in occupation of John
Asquith, the younger, but before then of Mrs. Ann Hudson.

Elm
with appurtenances and the following closes in the occupation of
William Greenwood.


Great Wise

2

3

4


Little Wise

1

2

15


West Royd or Pump Close

1

2

26


Great Maw Ridding

2

3

4


Little

1

3

38


Paddock or Pudding

0

1

28


Pott

2

3

21


Great Scallum

5

2

28


Little Scallum

4

1

39


Laverack Holm

2

2

9

Total

26

3

12

House,
barn, &c., and following closes in occupation of John Lund.


Croft

1

3

30


Kid Croft

0

2

33


Lairlands

0

2

23


Portobello or Stonebrigg-head

1

1

20


New Close

3

2

30


Great Broady Lands

4

2

20


Little

1

2

37


The Heads

4

3

12


Pudden

3

1

37


Summerhill

1

1

15


Little Summerhill close

0

2

28


Pighills

2

3

9


Ridding field

1

2

32

Total

29

2

6

Dwelling-house,
barn, &c., and the following closes in occupation of Brian Dale.

  


Haustheads

3

0

35


Tentercroft

0

2

12

Total

3

3

7

Dwelling-house,
barn, &c., and the following closes in occupation of Stephen Wade.


Barfside

0

1

0


In Stonebrigg

3

1

1


In Thornholm

1

1

24


Coate close or Colonel’s close

2

1

29


Whitaker’s Coate close

1

1

3


Upper Coate close

2

0

10


Low Coate close

2

0

1


Gullegrass

1

2

12


New close

1

0

16


Orchards End

1

3

39

Total

17

1

15

House.
Barn, &c., in occupation of John Asquith, the elder.

  


Backside

0

1

0


Turnip garth

0

0

12


Jane croft

2

2

6


Great Bent close

3

1

4


Far Bent close

1

1

30


Low Bent close or Little Bent close

1

1

30


In West Ings

1

1

39


In Brigg Holme

1

0

0


Little Foul Syke

2

1

30

Total

13

3

31

House,
barn, &c., in occupation of John Asquith, the younger

  


Hausthead

1

3

28


Gosling garth or Calf croft

0

1

18


Hawmires

4

0

23


Tranker Butts

1

2

33


Jane Ing

2

0

0


Two crofts

2

0

3


Mill dam croft

0

2

24

Total

12

3

9

In
occupation of John Longbottom.


Yawmire Leys

2

2

16


Blind Pool

3

1

0

Total

4

3

16

Law
close house, stables, &c., in occupation of William Smith.


Kelk

6

3

9


Little Brow

1

0

27


Middle Brow

2

0

23


Brow

2

2

28


Long close

2

0

14


Little Long close

1

3

13


Harewood Hill

2

0

7


Moor close

1

3

38


Ing or Law close Ing

3

3

4


Edge croft

1

2

16

Total

26

0

19

The
following closes were in the occupation of Christopher Mitton.


Great Fowlsyke

4

2

26


Sheet Pastures

4

1

14


Taylor’s acres in West Ing

5

3

3


Great Barrows

4

0

35


Little Barrows

1

1

21


Great Rough

5

3

3


Little Rough

1

0

34


Moor close, part of Great Rood

4

2

0


Great Coppite

7

1

35


Little Coppite

5

2

38

Total

45

0

9

Great
Wood or Law Close Wood or Currer Wood, Little Wood, Shroggs Wood, and
Ridding Wood, late in occupation of Mrs. Ann Hudson

41

2

7

Total

221

3

11

The
above estate consisted of 221 acres, and of 248¼ days’ work, was bought from
the daughters of Mrs. Ann Hudson by J.B. Garforth and Thomas Garforth, 12th
April, 1786, for £6500. J.B. Garforth makes a declaration 20th April, 1786,
that the purchase money was Thomas Garforth’s and that the purchase was his.
The total rental of the property was £220 13s. 0d., and the net rental, land
tax, &c., being deducted was £206 18s. 4d. The moor was not enclosed at
this time.

Thomas
Garforth bought from Christopher Moorhouse of Keighley, surgeon and
apothecary, Wise close and a parcel of land in Bridgeholme, for £110, July
29th, 1786.Dennis
Barrett of Steeton, yeoman, sold 22nd September, 1693, Christopher Moorhouse
of Steeton, for £40, 3rd November, 1689:— 8 closes, Yowmires, 2 Coat
closes, West Royd, Barrows, Gildgares, Cahard and Wythes.

John
Jackson of Steeton, yeoman, sold 22nd September, 1693, Christopher Moorhouse
of Steeton of Steeton, for £12, Mitchell croft, &c.

An
agreement was made 30th October, 1787, between Wm. Davy of Whitley Head, and
Thomas Garforth of Steeton. William Davy conveyed to Thomas Garforth before
May 21st, 1788, some ground on the west side of Steeton beck, on which there
was a.d. 1787, a stable and
other conveniences, and before that time there was a shoemaker’s shop and a
small garden to the east side thereof, on condition that Thomas Garforth pays
£6 15s. 6d., re-builds the stable in another place selected by William Davy,
and builds a burr wall round the
corner of the said ground. The piece of ground consisted of 124 square yards,
and there were 19 roods of walling. Also Mr. Garforth undertakes not to plant
any trees near or adjoining the said burr wall which will shade or be
detrimental to the buildings of Mr. William Davy. (See page 22/3).

Mr.
Thomas Garforth and Mr. William Davy exchanged lands May 4th, 1793. Mr.
Garforth obtained Longholm with road and beck course adjoining river Aire, and
a piece of land in Brigg-holme; Mr. Davy obtained New close adjoining
Thornholm.

William
Rishworth sold to him 1st November, 1787, to be given up by 1st May, 1788, all
right and title to road for watering cattle or fetching water across a certain
piece of road adjoining the east side of Steeton beck from the gate leading
into Mr. Garforth’s grounds at the north end thereof, and adjoining turnpike
road at south end thereof, Mr. Garforth putting water into John Roper’s fold
at his expense. This would allude to the spring called Dog-head Well, the
water of which contains iron and magnesia. The well gets its name from the
water running into it out of the figure of the head of a dog in stone. The
well and old carriage-drive, &c., would be made about a.d.
1788-90. In one of the cellars under the hall there are some rings which some
consider have been used for fastening people to.

William
Rishworth also sold to him 28th June, 1788, for £200:— a messuage and barn,
&c., Croft, Carter Royd now, a.d.
1788, divided into two by turnpike road, Barrows, Stonegrove and two parcels
in West Ings. They contained 12 days’ work, and were purchased by William
Rishworth 2nd March, 1787, for £88 15s. from Richard and Peter Bawdwen, late
of Steeton, whose daughter, Sarah, had married John Harrison. Richard and
Peter were their sons.

Joseph
Leach of Leeds, schoolmaster, sold 29th Feb., 1788, Thomas Garforth the
following, all being at Steeton, and in the tenure of John Bolton:—
dwelling-house with two barns, one sheep-cote in Cote close, Cote close,
Theaker croft, House croft, Pott lane-end, and Paddock.

Joseph
Leach, yeoman, of Steeton was the owner 14th November, 1734; he died a.d.
1742 and left the above property to his only son Joseph, who was not then,
1732, of age.

James
Fox, of Bramham Park, sold Mr. T. Garforth, 29th May, 1799, for £165 12s.
6d., six acres and a half-part of about nine acres of high ground, all
situated at Eastburn. Moor Butts, 1a. 2r. 15p. and Doles, 1a. 2r. 31p., being
part of the purchase.

The
trustees of the turnpike road sold him, 20th October, 1801, for £3 6s. 3d.,
part of the old turnpike road (now part of Pott-lane) from Wood street lane
bottom to the junction of the turnpike road. Pott-lane would get its name from
the field of that name situated at the bottom of the lane between the two
lanes. The recently purchased estates were made over to trustees to pay all
debts &c., December 21st, 1809.

In the
advertisement for the second sale, 15th December, 1818, the whole of the then
unsold portions of the estates of John Baynes Garforth and Thomas Garforth
consisted of 820 acres and a farm at Cowling, Warley Wise, containing 101
acres. It was advertised to take place at the Goat’s Head Inn. The property
was described to abound with stone, and with a little care would abound with
game of all sorts.

28
Page 14, line 6. — There have been for a long time some large fields called
“the Flatts.” In 1562 there were two closes of pasture called the Flatts
measuring 22 acres; about 1782 the Flatts contained 40 acres (it had probably
been enlarged 1780-82, and again enlarged 1786-90); and in 1822 59 acres.

29
Page 15, line 29. — On the tablet in Kildwick Church on the south wall in
the Chancel is written:—

This
monument is erected

Sacred

to
the memory of Thomas Garforth, Esq.,

late
of Steeton Hall in this county.

He
was highly distinguished as an able and

active
magistrate for the West Riding of

Yorkshire.

His
extensive capacity was peculiarly

conspicuous
in the accuracy of his judgment,

and
he was a man in his magisterial office

who
could readily unmask a

counterfeit
shew,

and
discern the characters of the heart.

Ob:
Dec. 6th, 1811, aged 55 years.

30
Page 17, line 26. — William Smith of Hollings House, yeoman, and Ann, wife
of William Thomas Hodshan, sold house and farm to Thomas Smith of Bradley,
yeoman, 4th June. 1668.

Over a
door at the Hollings is:— 1747. Consequently this farm was not in the possession of the Garforths
at that time.

31
Page 18. — At the sale of 18th and 19th May, 1819, they adjourned from the
“Goat’s Head” to Steeton Hall, then unoccupied on account of the number
of people.

Page 18,
line 38. — The following were the principal owners of land in the township
of Steeton with Eastburn, at the valuation of October, 1865. The area of the
township, 1955 acres, 1 rood, and of the river, roads, railway, lanes,
&c., 110 acres, 0 roods, 28 perches, total 2065 acres, 1 rood, 28 perches;
the annual value was £8416 4s. 2d., and the rateable value was £7317 6s.
10d. The annual value of Rectorial Tithe was £72, rated at £52 10s.; and the
Vicarial Tithe was £42, rated at £30 11s. 10d.

The
Owners of Land in the Township of Steeton with Eastburn, 1865.

 

A.

R.

P.

John
Bairstow

9

3

12

William
Bairstow

11

0

39

William
and John Bairstow

151

3

0

Thomas
and Matthew Bairstow

16

3

30

Matthew
Bairstow

56

2

29

Samuel
Bairstow

6

1

30

Henry
Barlow

23

0

25

Peter
Barrett

18

3

16

John
Blackborough

113

0

20

Charles
and Wm. Carr

118

0

15

Trustees
of Holmes Clapham

5

2

0

William
Clough

163

2

3

John
Clough and Sons

1

1

24

John
Clough

32

1

34

John
Coates

60

2

36

Thomas
Craven

3

2

11

Joseph
Craven

25

3

8

Joseph
Craven, junior

4

0

26

Thomas
Ogden Dixon

32

2

1

John
Dixon and Sons

21

3

30

William
Dixon

0

1

32

Trustees
of the late Elizabeth Driver

68

1

33

Geo.
Lane Fox

29

1

17

Trustees
of the late Thomas Garforth

206

3

9

Isaac
Hindle

5

2

35

Amos
Hodgson

36

0

8

Foster
Horsfall

45

2

12

Abraham
Maud

12

2

6

William
Maud

10

1

15

William
Mitchell

24

3

4

John
Rishworth

23

3

2

Trustees
of late Samuel Rishworth

16

3

20

William
Rishworth

24

1

3

Elizabeth
Shackleton and Martha Robinson

31

1

7

Binns
Smith

150

2

36

Elizabeth
Smith

36

2

37

George
Smith

154

3

2

Trustees
of the late John Greenwood Sugden

47

0

36

John
Summerscales

44

3

7

Airedale
Drainage Commissioners

1

2

24

Midland
Railway Company

4

3

10

Inhabitants
of Steeton with Eastburn

3

2

30

32
Page 19, line 2. — As the “Packhorse” is the only Inn at Steeton
mentioned in Carey’s Itinerary, 1798, most probably this Inn would be
considered the principal one. The road was made through Hawkcliffe to Utley
Greenhead 1780-82. From the steepness of the Old Bank, it would be inferred
naturally that it was not suitable for coaches, and that pack-horses would be
generally used. In Asia Minor at the present day all traffic is done by
camels, horses, or donkeys, the roads are not made so that carts or waggons
could be used. On Thursday, November 30th, 1780, a town’s meeting was held
at the “Old Star” Inn, the house of John Asquith; and on April 19th, 1781,
a town’s meeting was held at the “Pack Horse” Inn, the house of James
Craven. At the latter meeting, John Asquith, junior, was hired to serve the
offices of Constable and Overseer of the Poor for this township the year
ensuing, for the sum of £2 10s.

33
Page 19, line 6. — I G and A G would not mean Jennet and Anthony Garforth,
both being then dead. There were at that time many freeholders in Steeton,
consequently it is difficult to make out with certainty for whom the letter
were the initials. The present “Goat’s Head” Inn probably would be built
a.d. 1781, the same time when
the road through Hawkcliffe was being made.

34
Page 19, line 19. — The appearance of the streams was altered a.d.
1862-4, when the river was cut. In the river the remains of the timber bridge
of a.d. 1782-1804, may now be
seen.

35
Page 20, line 19. — In the year 1680 there was a public-house at Eastburn,
called “New Inn,” kept by Henry Ripley.

The road
from Sutton which joins the turnpike near Eastburn was made 1797-99, and part
of the common land in Sutton township was sold to pay the expense. The Act of
Parliament for enclosing Sutton Moor was obtained 17th June, 1815. There was
then 1000 acres of unenclosed land which was divided among the landowners.

36
Page 21, lines 14 and 32. — The Baynes family lived at Mewith Head, near
Bentham. Ralph Baynes married for his second wife, Elizabeth Garforth. She was
a widow 1738, died at Skipton a.d. 1743,
and was interred at Kildwick. Over a barn-door at Mewith Head Hall is the
inscription:—

R
B  M

1708

He had
two sons by his first wife, Robert Baynes, Esq., of Mewith Head, and George
Baynes, yeoman, of Embsay Kirk. Mr. Robert Baynes of Mewith Head, died without
issue July, 1743, and left all his lands, Mewith Head Hall, &c., to his
wife Jane absolutely; some of his property situated at Lower Bentham was
purchased by his father, Ralph Baynes. She was the daughter of ————
King of Skellans, Kirby Malhamdale, and married secondly Dr. Cookson of
Wakefield. Mr. Baynes of Embsay Kirk, died June, 1743, leaving a wife
Elizabeth, and three sons and a daughter, John, William, George, and Jane.
Consequently William Baynes of Embsay Kirk, who was the father of John Baynes,
was a great help to Dr. Whitaker in his History of Craven, and to whom Dr
Whitaker expresses his indebtedness in that work, (he died a.d.
1787, aged 28,) was nephew to John Baynes Garforth.

37
Page 21, line 19. — The quantity of land here mentioned is not the exact
amount, but it is put into round figures. There would be above 900 acres of
moor, common of pasture to all freeholders in Steeton.

The
estate belonging to John Baynes Garforth of Steeton, gentleman, 22nd March,
1750, which he inherited from his uncle, consisted of:— Steeton Hall,
Steeton Mill, a close at the backside of hall called Orthard, Hallcliffe Wood,
Acre Broadholme, New Ing, in the occupation of John Baynes Garforth; Rye
Garth, Summerhills, Two Hall crofts, Great Flatts, Birstall Braceletts,
Thornflatt, Low Broadholme, Crook, Upper Longlands, Lower Longlands, Tranker,
Rhoydes, and New Park, in the occupation of Leonard Smith, Thomas Lund, John
Asquith, and Jeremiah Booth; Dwelling-house at Bankbottom with barns,
outhouses, and two crofts on the back; Flatts (adjoining Great Flatts),
Barrows, Higher Broadholme, Thisley Broadholme, Lower Crook, in occupation of
Henry Smith; Wood Farm and Hallcliffe Farm with the following closes, Helmroyd,
Wiggons, Rushey Close, Two Brows, Wood Close, Stackland Hill, Saltern Ing,
Cragg Top, and New Ing Head, in occupation of Jeremiah Hustler and John
Hodgson; Dwelling-house, Edgecroft, Guildknack-hall, in occupation of John
Town; Whitley Head Farm, Whitleys, Crofts, Meadows, Two Whitleys, Ridding
Wood, and Barrows Lane, in occupation of Richard Greenwood; Jackson’s
Intacks in occupation of David Davy; Dwelling-house, barn, &c., in
occupation of Mr. John Dixon; Four Dwelling-houses to the back of the
preceding, with two gardens, in occupation of Benjamin Smith; Dwelling-houses
in occupation of John Smith and Thos. Broadley; Dwelling-houses with
crofts and gardens in occupation of Jeremiah Hustler, Joseph Moor, Henry
Wilkinson, and Christopher Baxter. A farm situate at Cowling-head called
Warley Wise in the occupation of John Shuttleworth; several closes of parcels
of ground at Cowling-head in occupation of Mr. Hewett. Situate at Gargrave
were:— Higher Haw, Lower Haw, Melbank Scar, Gamblers Foot, in occupation of
John Moorhouse, and a third-part of the rectory. The preceding was all the
property in Yorkshire belonging to John Baynes Garforth a.d.
1750.

38
Page 22, line 5. — William Currer was born at Steeton a.d.
1644, being second son of Hugh and Elizabeth Currer. He went to live in
London, and in the year 1700 he was a Mercer in Saint Lawrence Lane, London.
On December 27th, 1707, and February 20th, 1708, he is described as of
Steeton, gentleman. He evidently was very successful in his business in
London, for we know that he had about £70 left by his father, and that
afterwards, he spent in buying land at Steeton not less than £2272 10s. The
purchases of land in this township which he made, he left to Hugh Currer,
eldest son of his eldest brother Hugh Currer. Hugh Currer was the owner of the
Upper Hall and considerable land with it; William evidently anxious to keep
the Currer estate together, took every means that he could for that end. He
left his purchases (except Barrows, Hedgecroft, 2 days’ work in Foulsyke,
and one parcel in West Ing adjoining Taylor’s Acres,) to trustees, (Henry
Currer of Kildwick, and Roger Coates of Royd House,) in strict settlement to
Hugh Currer, his nephew, on condition that the said Hugh Currer gave his
property (Upper Hall, &c.,) to the same trustees to be held in the same
manner. This he did. The will of William Currer is dated January 13th, 1712.

The
following are the purchases which were made by William Currer:—

From Ann
Alkinson of Poole, spinster, August 6th, 1700, for £500:

Cunnans
3 days’ work, with waste belonging, Wise close 4 days’ ploughing, Little
Maw Ridding, one Parrock 3 days’ ploughing, Great Maw Ridding 4 days’
work, Pott 4 days’, the preceding with dwelling-house, &c.; Great
Scallum 6 days’ mowing, Little Scallum 5 days’ mowing, Lowerack Holm or
Laverack Holme, Great Brigholme, Mitchell Brigholme, the last three closes
containing 10 days’ ploughing; Bristow Head, 2 acres of Meadow and 1
half-crown dole in West Ings. All situated at Steeton, and containing 39
days’ work and 2 acres of meadow; or about 35 acres.

From
Richard Wheelwright, late of Steeton, yeoman, but then of Schoales in the
parish of Keighley, on February 20th, 1708, for £147 10s. Dwelling-house,
barns, etc., where Richard Wheelwright did lately live, but then in occupation
of Michael Pighills, Three Bent closes, Yowmer, Drake Sike, the Wise, piece in
West Ings 3 roods. The whole containing 12 acres, 3 roods.

From
John Smith, late of Hainworth, but then of Hill-end, Bingley, on June 2nd,
1712, for £1065. That newly erected dwelling-house where Elizabeth Smith and
two sons live, and one barn, buildings, stables, gardens, &c., and croft,
Broady Lands, Jane Ing, Upper Stone Brigg, Pudding Sike, Pudding, Ridding
Wood, containing 12 acres; ½ acre in New Close, Boodans 1 acre; another
dwelling-house where John Smith did live, one barn, &c., and one croft,
two parcels of land in Stonebrigg called Outside, and Little Stonebrigg, in
Broadholm called Effey land ½ day’s work, Jane Croft 1½ acres, Foulsyke
and one lane belonging to it 5 acres, three lands in Far Broady Lands 3½
roods, Old Pinfold at the west-end of a barn in possession of Elizabeth Smith,
and all waste ground between said barn and brook called Steeton Beck, except a
footway to Steeton mill for all persons; a newly erected dwelling-house
wherein Robert Walsh lived, with barn, &c., three crofts adjoining said
house, the Croft, Kid Croft and Edge croft, two Barrows, then in occupation of
Hugh Currer; four doles in West Ing, Tranker Butts, Thornholm, New Close, 2
days’ work in Broady Lands, ½ day’s work in Foulsyke, Barrows, Heads,
Bowdens, Carter Royd and one barn standing therein, Laith Lands, two parcels
in Stonebrigg, one parcel in West Ings to the south of Taylor’s Acres, 2
acres in West Ings, and dwelling-house wherein Timothy Crossley lived, with
two barns; Croft 1½ days’ work, Great Sand Hill or Summerhill, and Little
Summerhill 3 days’ work, and one parcel in Stonebrigg. This purchase was
charged with the annual payment of £4 6s. 8d., and would consist of about 60
acres.

William
Currer, gentleman, of Steeton, bought of Henry Moorhouse of Ickornshaw, and
John Moorhouse of Hipperholme, (two brothers,) December 22nd, 1712, for £200:—
Law Close dwelling-house, in occupation of Dennis Davy, with one barn,
&c., (Dennis Davy died a.d.
1714, aged about 46, and was buried at Calversyke Hill), Law Close, Harrot
Hill, Little Close at upper end of Harrot Hill, Long Close beneath the house,
Close above the house, Stubb Close, Wood Close, and a piece Wood, the
preceding measuring half an oxgang or 13 acres; and Whitaker’s Coat Close
with barn or cote at the upper end 1½ acres.

William
Currer, late of St. Lawrence Lane, London, Mercer, but then of Steeton,
purchased from Henry Currer of Kildwick, Esq., December 27th, 1707, for £340:—
Dwelling-house in occupation of Jeremy Craven with two barns, &c., Oates
Croft ½ an acre, two Pighills 4 acres, Grimes Croft (formerly divided into
three closes) 4 acres, Little Tankard or Little Ing 1 acre, in Stonebrigg a
dole, Boodans 2 acres, Nar Close, Guldgars, Orthard End, Yow Myer or Lower
Poits, Yew Myer Hill, Wise, West Royd, Barrows, two Coat closes;
dwelling-house with barn, &c., a croft ½ acre, Hall croft or Kidcroft ½
acre, Grimes Croft, another dwelling-house, barn, &c., and a croft. All
the property was situated at Steeton and consisted of about 30 acres.

From
John Hustler of Steeton, yeoman, January 14th, 1707, for £20, he purchased a
close called Wise Close.

From
Jeremiah Brigg of Laycock, a cottage, formerly a shop, Foulsyke 3 acres, and
Mitchell Croft 3 roods.

William
Currer purchased about 157 acres.

Jeremy
Craven of Steeton, sold John Smith of Hill-end, Bingley, 25th, August, 1708,
for £112:— Great and Little Summerhill 3 days’ work, a croft 3½ days’
work, and a dwelling-house in occupation of Jeremy Craven.

a.d.
1712, Joseph Parkinson and his son and heir, William Parkinson, were owners of
property at Eastburn.

Christopher
Hartley of Barrowford, sold property at Eastburn for £310 to Joseph
Parkinson, a.d. 1674.

39
Page 22, line 15. — It is very probable that John Garforth of Farnhill, was
a relation of the Steeton Garforths.

40
Page 22. — The following are the names of the Currers of Steeton, who owned
the Upper Hall and estate:—

Hugh
Currer of Steeton, yeoman, son of Hugh Currer of Kildwick. He married Mary
———, probably a Bawdwen of Stonegappe, 1618, and died 1636. He left two
sons and two daughters; to his second son William, he left the lands at
Steeton that he held from the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem. His will was
made January 2nd, 1633, and it is directed in it that he is to be buried in
Kildwick Church.

Hugh
Currer of Steeton, yeoman, elder son of the preceding, married Elizabeth
————, born 1622, died 1670. He married secondly Mary ————, who
received from the estate £22 a year after her husband’s death. He owned
some property at Garside, near Sedburgh, which he left to his children by his
second wife. He left eleven children, Hugh, William, John, Henry, Christopher,
Mary, Ellen, by his first wife; and Margaret, Anne, Elizabeth and Thomas by
his second wife. The children by his first wife were left £50 apiece out of
the lands at Steeton, and £200 was divided equally among all the younger
children.

Hugh
Currer, eldest son of the preceding Hugh and Elizabeth. William Currer citizen
of London, but lived afterwards at Steeton, was his next brother. The Upper
Hall was built by this Hugh Currer. He married Ann ————. He died 1696,
leaving his estate to his wife for ten years, until Elizabeth was fourteen
years of age, to bring up his younger children, Henry, William, Ann, Margaret,
Martha, and Elizabeth, and then the estate to his eldest son Hugh, subject to
paying £40 each to the sons and £30 each to the daughters. His wife Anne a
third of the estate for life. His will dated December 19th, 1693. All the
daughters got married. Most of the above charges on the estate were paid by
William Currer, late citizen of London.

The
estate which he left to his eldest son was:— Dwelling-house where Hugh
Currer lived (a.d. 1716,)
gardens, folds, &c., (Upper Hall,) Parrock, Goslin Garth, Upper Halstead,
Lower Halstead, Over Kelk, Lower Kelk, Yewmire, Blind Pool, Barrows, Barrows
Hill, Law Close or backside of the laith and barn standing on it, Two middle
closes, Rye Stubble, New Ground, Little Ing, Great Ing, Ing under the wood,
Ing under Law Close, the Wood, Farside of the wood, Sites of two cottages
lately demolished, a barn, garden and croft, a cottage and garden, and Crusan
Croft or Tenter-croft.

Hugh
Currer in making the above estate over to Henry Currer of Kildwick, and Roger
Coates of Royd House, had power to charge it with £8 a year to Anne his
mother, and £15 to Bridget his wife. As fields often lose their old names,
and are known by other names, and sometimes two are made into one, and at
other times divided, it is impossible to calculate exactly the area of the
estate just mentioned but it would probably be about 70 acres.

The
entail was cut off February, 1726, when Henry Currer of New Close, in the
parish of Bradford received £530 for his reversionary interest.

 Hugh
Currer born 1672, and died 1738. He married Bridget ————, and left a
son William and two daughters, Ann and Isabella. Isabella married Mr. Wray
Atkinson but had no issue.

William
Currer born 1707, and died 1748, leaving all his property to his sister Ann,
who had married previous to a.d.
1734, William Hudson of Cadney, in Lincolnshire. William was the last of the
Currers of Steeton.

Mrs. Ann
Hudson was the next owner. Her husband was dead October 26th, 1764, and
probably died in the year. Mrs. Hudson lived mostly in Lincolnshire. She died
January 29th, 1785, and left her estate at Steeton to her daughters, Ann wife
of William Holgate, Isabella unmarried, and Sarah wife of Josiah Prickett who
sold it April, 1786 for £6500. Mrs. Hudson also had some land at Winterburn,
which was charged with an annuity for life to her daughter, Mary, wife of
Thomas Tillotson.

41
Page 23, line 20. — Alice Davy, widow of Dionis Davy, who died a.d.
1646, and William their eldest son purchased a.d.
1649:— West-end part of house called Whitley with barns, buildings, gardens,
&c., then in occupation of Alice Davy. Knott Whitley then divided into two
closes, Far close or Fan close adjoining Knott Whitley on the north part,
Great Gill, Leyes close adjoining Great Gill on the east part, and Barrowes
adjoining Leyes close or some part thereof on the south-west part; also common
of pasture for all beasts, sheep, &c., kept on the premises, and common of
turbary to be burned on premises or in any other dwelling-house thereon
erected; Cart Cote and Heckstands in Hawkcliffe Wood. William Davy of Whitley
Head, was buried at Kildwick a.d.
1652. The Davys being a Quaker family, it is said they were subjected to
persecution about a.d. 1660.

42
Page 23, line 35. — William Davy married the daughter of Lawrence Roberts of
Cunendley, at Henry Woods, Grange Woodside, which is settled on them:—
(David Davy, Whitley Head, clothier, and Daniel Roberts, linenweaver, of
Cononley, being trustees,) an outer parlour and chamber over it, one barn at
east end of new house and Farther Knott Whitley, Far close, Kiln close,
Barrows close, and Laith close, all containing 8 acres.

43
Page 23, line 37. — The purchase of March 6th, 1709, was:— three closes
called Intakes or Intacks; and Cragg close, Cow close, Ing, Ing End, Cragg
Top, an old barn, two garths, parcel called Penny-piece, all enclosed from
Lower Whitley and called Adam’s Farm, and containing 10 acres.

Richard
Dixon of Sutton, sold to William Davy of Whitley Head £40, three days’ work
in Summerhill.

44
Page 23, line 42. — David Davy, yeoman, bought 10th November, 1748, for £203,
from three married daughters of Mary, wife of Colonel John Beckwith; she was
the daughter of John Gregson of Manningham:— Thornhalm, West Ing close,
Peaseham Tree or Peasandry, the Heads, Barrows, Yeomonth or Yeomorend, Bowdams,
containing 16 acres, and in occupation of John Craven, and situated at
Steeton; also Thornhelm in Stonebrigg 2 roods, a Dole in West Ings 2 roods,
and a piece in Summerhill 3 roods.

David
Davy of Whitley Head, and William, his son, purchased February 25th, 1759, for
£365, from Bernard Metcalf of Finney, in the parish of Almondbury, co. York,
the following charged with an annuity of £20 to Godfrey Rhodes, Esq., of
Ripon:— House at Steeton where Thomas Wade lives, with barn, one shop, one
stable, one hog-stye, garden, orchard, &c., the Croft, Tues Royd, Wise
close, West Ings close, Greater Summerhill close, Lesser Summerhill close, the
Pudding, containing 20 days’ work; also house in occupation of Mary Smith
and Leonard Smith, &c., the Croft, Spicer croft, Bral Stubbings,
containing 6 days’ work; also one barn near Hawkcliffe and three closes
called the Heads, 10 days’ work, and in occupation of Leonard Smith; Doles
in West Ings 2 days’ work, in Broady Lands 3 days’ work, a cottage with a
building (formerly a smithy) attached; also Barrows and Read Ing 10 days’
work, and all property at Steeton belonging Bernard Metcalf. The whole
contained 51 days’ work, and at one time was the property of Margaret Holmes
of Liverpool.

The
estate of William Davy would consist a.d.
1780, of 80 to 85 acres.

45
Page 24, line 39. — William Rishworth bought from Stephen Moorhouse,
September 23rd, 1704, for £475:— two dwelling-houses at Eastburn in
occupation of Stephen Moorhouse, with two barns, a fold, two gardens, stable,
mistal, &c., Tithe laith, Garth croft, Settle hole, Nar Shay, Far Shay,
Nar Moor close, Can or Duck Mire, Fan Moor closes, Cross Butts, Tarn Ing, Moor
Butts, Kidd Croft containing 48 acres; ½ acre in a close called Stubbs, 2½
days’ ploughing in a field called Holme.

The name
of the wife of William Rishworth was Mary.

46
Page 24, line 43. — The estate of William Rishworth in the township of
Steeton with Eastburn, consisted a.d.
1780-86, of 53½ days’ work, or 37 acres, 1 rood, and was valued at £46
19s. per annum.

47
Page 25, line 3. — William Rishworth was the father of William and John, of
Eastburn. Thomas went to live near Aberford.

48
Page 25, line 6. — Previous to the Stirks being the owners of the Hobhill
and certain lands with it, it was the property of the Cravens, and before them
of the Whitakers, and before them of the Oglethorpes, &c., Plumptons, and
Styvetons.

Richard
Whitaker bought one-fourth part of Hobhill, &c., of William Oglethorpe of
Roundhay, and Elizabeth, his wife, 11th June 1599; he also bought 20th
December, 1607, two fourth parts, of William Slater of Halifax.

William
Whitaker of Ellercar, in the parish of Bingley, yeoman, son and heir of
Richard Whitaker of the same place, deceased, sold Richard Whitaker of
Steeton, husbandman, for £49 12s. 6d. three parts, (the whole being divided
into four parts), 15th September 1615, of messuage in Steeton late in
occupation of Jennet Walker, widow, and then of said Richard Whitaker, and
also three parts of barns, closes, &c., generally going with the same.

Richard
Whitaker of Steeton sold 26th July, 1653, to Christopher Craven of Steeton for
£117:— All that messuage, barns, orchards in Steeton, in occupation of said
Richard Whitaker, the Croft, Sandgill close, Barrast, Parrock, Wise close, in
West Ing, Labenake Dole, Wray Dole, Little Algoads, Berkdole, Sandgill land in
Stonebrigg, all in Steeton, and in occupation of Richard Whitaker.

On July
10th, 1622, Dionsius Davy, yeoman, of Steeton, sold to Francis Craven of
Steeton, agricola, three parts of a messuage and land, &c., in Steeton,
then in occupation of said Francis Craven.

The
Stirks are a family that lived on Silsden Moor for a long time.

Francis
Stirke of Silsden Moor, married a.d. 1605,
Elizabeth Simpson, and had a son, Anthony, born a.d. 1606.
Anthony Stirke married a.d. 1630,
Elizabeth Scarborough, and had a son, Francis, born in the same year. Francis
married Ann ————, and had Henry, born a.d. 1662,
and Francis, born a.d. 1664.

Henry
Stirk of Silsden Moor, yeoman, bought of Jeremiah Craven of Steeton, yeoman,
and Elizabeth, his wife, 26th November, 1715, the Hobhill, &c., then
inhabited by Jeremiah Craven. The purchase consisted of:— newly erected
dwelling-house with barn adjoining it on the east, a garth to the west with a
spring or well in it, another garth, four closes called Barrases containing 4
acres, with one barn standing between two higher of said Barrases, Parrock ¾
acre, Wise close ¾ acre, six parcels of land in West Ing, viz.:— Laverack
Dole, Wraydole, Hustlerdole-head, Longdole, West-royd Dole, Whamdole,
containing in all 2 acres, Stone groves 1 acre, Two Lane-end closes 1½ acres
with small parcel at south end of said closes, Berkdole ½ acre; and one
quarter of one part of all the commons, waste ground, moor, &c., of
Steeton and Eastburn, the aforesaid to be divided into four equal parts.

Witnessed
by John Topham of Kildwick, clerk, William Morland of Skipton Castle, and
Francis Stirk of Silsden Moor. The above property was all that remained in
Steeton belonging to Jeremiah Craven.

He also
bought the Cragg, in the township of Sutton. Henry Stirk of Cringles, bought
it consisting of two messuages and about 40 acres, of Samuel Coates his
heir-apparent a.d. 1730.
The Cragg was bought by John Dranesfield of Sutton, from Edward Copley, Esq.,
of Batley, 22 March, 1612, for £41 2s. 8d. He also made a purchase of
William Copley of Batley, 1620. John Horrocks married Mary Dranesfield, 1683.
Dranesfield Horrocks of Sutton, sold the Cragg for £505, to William Eastburn
of Silsden Moor, 15th March, 1707.

Henry
Stirk lived afterwards at the Cragg, where he died a.d. 1744,
leaving his property at Steeton and Sutton (the Hobhill and the Cragg,) to his
nephew, Henry Stirk of Silsden Moor, son of Francis and Jane Stirk; and the
residue of all his estate, real and personal, to his brother Francis of
Silsden Moor, who was born 1664, married 1692, Jane Wilson, and died 1757 at
the age of 93.

Henry
Stirk, nephew, lived after him at the Cragg, he was born 1692, married a.d. 1720,
Ann Coates, and died 1749, leaving the Cragg to his elder son Francis, and to
his younger son Henry he left the Hobhill, some property at Draughton, and the
goodwill of two farms, Moorgate on Silsden Moor, and a farm at Bradley
Moorside.

Part of
the Cragg, at Sutton, now belongs to William Stirk of Glusburn, grandson of
the above Francis Stirk. Francis Stirk was born on Silsden Moor, May 20th,
1728, and married a.d. 1752,
Margaret Hargreaves.

It is
probable that the Stirks did not live much at the Hobhill, they generally
lived either at the Cragg or Silsden Moor. In the years 1728 and 1753, William
Anderton and John Harrison were their tenants at Steeton. William Anderton was
fined 3s. 4d. or to pull the wall down at the Court Baron of Thomas Garforth a.d. 1728,
for encroachment on lord’s waste on highway leading from Steeton to
Kildwick. The nest owner, Henry Stirk, lived on Silsden Moor, he was born
1734, married Sarah Rishworth of Addingham Moorside, died 1798, leaving three
daughters, Ann born at Sutton, October 18th, 1763, who married Thomas Pearson,
and inherited the Hobhill; Sarah born at Steeton 1765, who married Thomas
Heyworth and got the farms on Silsden Moor and Bradley; Elizabeth born at
Silsden Moor 1774, and married John Cockshott of Addingham, and afterwards of
Shipley, she inherited the property at Draughton which had been purchased 12th
September, 1726, of William Bramley of Snow-Hill Top, by Henry Stirk.

Henry
Stirk, yeoman, of Silsden Moor, sold Thomas Garforth of Steeton for £66 17s.,
October 30th, 1787, a close called Wise containing ¾ of an acre, and the
right of common belonging to it. They also had an exchange of property 9th
January, 1792, when Thomas Garforth gave the Barrows, Cabbage Croft, a small
piece at west end of Cabbage Croft, and on south side of old turnpike road
leading from Keighley to Skipton, another piece part of Near Close, bounded on
the east by the Flatts, and on the west by an old way called Pott Lane; Henry
Stirk gave Lane-ends with road and beck course on the east side of it,
Stonegroves, 17 perches in West Ing, another piece measuring 24 perches in
West Ings, all then in occupation of Thomas Pearson. John Hustler of Steeton,
sold David Wright, yeoman, of Steeton, Barrows Close, 14th April, 1704, for £21.

Richard
Dixon of Sutton, gentleman, sold February 3rd, 1703, for £37 10s., to David
Wright of Steeton, Carter Royd with barn thereon 2 acres, and Bowdens 1 acre.

The
property belonging to Henry Stirk at Steeton a.d.
1782, consisted of:—

  

Day’s
Work

A.

R.

P.

£

s.

d.

House,
Barn, &c.

  

Stonegroves

2

1

3

0

2

10

0

Paddock

1

0

3

0

1

0

0

In
West Ings

3

2

0

0

3

0

0

Lane-end

3

2

0

0

2

2

0

Brows

1

0

0

1

10

0


1

0

0

1

10

0

Coat
Close

1

0

0

1

10

0

Hunger
Hill

1

0

0

1

10

0

Wise

1

0

3

0

0

17

0

16

11

1

0

£15

9

0

49
Page 25, line 33. — The stone on which Sir Robert Peel’s statue stands at
Bradford, came from Hawkcliffe Wood.

50
Page 26, line 24. — In the old chapel at Barrows Lane, Sunday School was
first commenced there a.d. 1816.
Then writing and arithmetic were taught at Sunday schools, the opportunities
for education being much greater now, the teaching of those subjects is
unnecessary. The erection of the chapel cost a.d.
1826 £833, it has accommodation for 358 people. The number of scholars at the
Sunday School have been:—

Year.

Roll.

Average
Attendance

1858

141

105

1873

217

131

1885

153

107

The
Primitive Methodist Chapel has sitting for 96 people; and the Eastburn
Primitive Methodist Chapel was built a.d.
1858-9.

51
Page 26, line 26. — The Provident Day School was built a.d.
1851. The building cost £263 5s. 2½ d., including £69 7s. 6d.
paid for land to W. Ferguson; in addition several people who didn’t give
money, gave their labour, carted stones, &c. The following were the
principal subscriptions towards its erection, some of them were given at
twice:— Joseph Craven £50, W. Bairstow £40, John Clough £40, John Dixon
£10, John Dixon & Sons £10, M. Bairstow £5, William Clough £5, William
Maud £5, James Parrish £5, William Wright £5, a Soirée £12, &c.

The Soirée
took place 19th July, 1852, there was a tea at 4-30 p.m. in large room
adjoining corn-mill, and in the evening there was a concert in the
school-room.

The
number of scholars attending the school were:—

Year.

Scholars.

1854

83

1864

107

1870

175

After
the passing of the Education Act 1870, the infants were kept separate. The
following numbers refer to those above seven years of age.

Year.

Roll.

Average

Passes
per cent.

School-pence

Attendance.

£

s.

d.

1872

220

127

87

97

11

7

1880

180

105.24

80

81

18

8

1884

168

118.10

88

85

16

8

The
population was less in 1884 owing to bad trade. The infants numbering about 80
for each year with an average attendance of about 50.

Previous
to a.d. 1852, the education of
the village was provided irregularly by anyone who had a little knowledge and
who could get a few pupils. A Mrs. Slack and a Mrs. Glover kept “Dame”
schools, and a man of the name of Binns, who had one arm, had a school.

The Post
Office was opened 4th September, 1859, George Holmes then keeping it. He died
August, 1884, and it is now continued by Mrs Holmes. Previous to that time, a
postman, “Old Sutcliffe” came from Keighley with the letters. He came in
the morning, went further up the valley, and returned through Steeton at 5
p.m. Letters were put on the window sashes for him. He was dressed in a red
coat, came limping along tooting occasionally with his brass horn. After
Sutcliffe, a person named Holt was a postman a few months. In 1883, an outward
dispatch in a forenoon was begun, thus the village has now two incoming posts
a day though they are only delivered in a morning, and two dispatches.

The
social life of Steeton is different now to formerly, in 1826, they worked in
the mills from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., on Saturdays 6 a.m. to 4 and 5 p.m.;
now the hours are from 6 a.m. to 5-15 p.m., and on Saturdays they
cease at 1 p.m. Now, though Steeton is but a village, it has the
advantages of the town. Water and gas are provided for its inhabitants. The
two reservoirs belonging to the township were made a.d. 1878,
since which time there has been a supply of excellent water, and in January,
1878, the Kildwick Parish Gas Co. commenced to supply gas. The lamps in the
streets and lanes were first began November, 1883, and the footpaths have been
put gradually into their present order from 1882-6, the authorities repairing
the top portion of the road to the station.

The
population, &c., of the township of Steeton with Eastburn was:—

Year.

Population.

Houses.

Annual
Value.

Rateable
Value.

£

s.

d.

£

s.

d.

1822

612

136

1759

7

5

1849

1012

225

5724

11

0

4912

18

4

1861

1341

280

8569

6

4

7747

4

1

1871

1632

339

8937

0

0

7724

0

0

1881-2

1497

357

10401

15

0

8279

2

6

The
termination of this pamphlet is arrived at. What it contains is obtained from
old deeds, tradition, and the recollection of old people still living. Perhaps
everything here could not be proved to a certainty, but in this, like
histories of larger and more important places, the most has to be made of the
materials that we have. Many stories that have been handed down to us for
different reasons, do not form a part of this work. Often a tale that is
interesting when told is difficult to put into writing.

The
miscellaneous information to be found here is only interesting to people with
antiquarian tastes, and to those who live or know the village intimately. The
accounts of sales of land, names of fields, and the pedigrees will serve to a
certain extent for a reference.

There is
perhaps more labour in getting many little items of information together for a
work like this than at first sight appears. Often a simple fact is very
difficult to obtain.

But to
unravel the forgotten past cannot be considered to be entirely work without
some good result to recommend it to the most utilitarian minds.

If we
could go back two centuries, what a change we should see. It is said that
Steeton boasted its village green, and that it was situated behind Mr. W.
Bairstow’s, and to the east of the corn-mill dam.

“All
the village train, from labour free,

Led
up their sports beneath the spreading tree;

While
many a pastime circled in the shade,

The
young contending as the old survey’d;

And
many a gambol frolick’d o’er the ground,

And
sleights of art and feats of strength went round;

These
were thy charms, sweet village! Sports like these,

With
sweet succession, taught e’en toil to please;

These
round thy bowers their cheerful influence shed,

These
were thy charms — but all these charms are fled.”

But
perhaps the superiority of the “good old times” over the present is more
in the imagination of the poet that an actual fact. The lives of the great
majority of the people are probably both brighter and happier in these modern
days of railways and telegraphs.

The Shroggs,

Steeton,
1886

www.steeton.net